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Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens

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This latest addition to the TJEd library is written to youth and adults wanting to accomplish a successful Scholar Phasenot only academically, but in personal development and mission preparation. It includes: How to find the Real You, the Teen-100 List, how to study the classics, how to make the most of your mentor, sample simulations, a list of online resources plus lots This latest addition to the TJEd library is written to youth and adults wanting to accomplish a successful Scholar Phase—not only academically, but in personal development and mission preparation. It includes: How to find the Real You, the Teen-100 List, how to study the classics, how to make the most of your mentor, sample simulations, a list of online resources plus lots more!


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This latest addition to the TJEd library is written to youth and adults wanting to accomplish a successful Scholar Phasenot only academically, but in personal development and mission preparation. It includes: How to find the Real You, the Teen-100 List, how to study the classics, how to make the most of your mentor, sample simulations, a list of online resources plus lots This latest addition to the TJEd library is written to youth and adults wanting to accomplish a successful Scholar Phase—not only academically, but in personal development and mission preparation. It includes: How to find the Real You, the Teen-100 List, how to study the classics, how to make the most of your mentor, sample simulations, a list of online resources plus lots more!

30 review for Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens

  1. 4 out of 5

    Celestia

    This is a great book! The list of 100 classics to read has some books I really want to read with my teens/youth. I can't wait to discuss these books with them. I really appreciate the simulations at the back and the suggestions of the different roles a parent mentor should take on. TJED has come a long way from the feeling I got from listening to DeMille over ten years ago that was commonly felt among homeschoolers: "Now how do we do this?" This is full of concrete suggestions. A much easier rea This is a great book! The list of 100 classics to read has some books I really want to read with my teens/youth. I can't wait to discuss these books with them. I really appreciate the simulations at the back and the suggestions of the different roles a parent mentor should take on. TJED has come a long way from the feeling I got from listening to DeMille over ten years ago that was commonly felt among homeschoolers: "Now how do we do this?" This is full of concrete suggestions. A much easier read than Leadership Education: the Phases of Learning. I give it four out of five stars because it has no index. When will the DeMilles start putting an index in their books? Also because of the mistake by the authors of calling bobby socks as socks that go to the knee. Maybe I'm being too picky, but if you are going to write about history, even if it's something as trivial as fashion in the 50s, at least make sure you get it right.

  2. 4 out of 5

    LaRae

    I liked several things about this book; however, in many respects it felt like the authors were *talking down* to the reader, because it was written for youth. This bothered me because I really don't think kids need to be condescended to, but the information in the book is still valuable. Thus, the 3 stars are more for style than content. The 100 classics for teens book list is very useful. As a parent, if you are reading this with or for your child, I think it's important to also read A Thomas I liked several things about this book; however, in many respects it felt like the authors were *talking down* to the reader, because it was written for youth. This bothered me because I really don't think kids need to be condescended to, but the information in the book is still valuable. Thus, the 3 stars are more for style than content. The 100 classics for teens book list is very useful. As a parent, if you are reading this with or for your child, I think it's important to also read A Thomas Jefferson Education.

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.

    2011 Summer reading ---- Finished this today. (Well, still working on answering the Great Teen Questions) but that takes a while... It is not my purpose here to recap the book nor fully explain the concepts (purely making notes for myself). Read it yourself. I read this because my 12yo will soon be reading this and I wanted to be one up on him. It is definitely worth reading as direction-needing adult as well. Some key points: (6) “Without a truly superb education, very few people are able to figure 2011 Summer reading ---- Finished this today. (Well, still working on answering the Great Teen Questions) but that takes a while... It is not my purpose here to recap the book nor fully explain the concepts (purely making notes for myself). Read it yourself. I read this because my 12yo will soon be reading this and I wanted to be one up on him. It is definitely worth reading as direction-needing adult as well. Some key points: (6) “Without a truly superb education, very few people are able to figure out what they are supposed to know—how to always tell the difference between wisdom & pessimism, idealism & just being too naïve, and the true, excellent kind of pro-active innovative realism versus its counterfeit.” I learned some interesting things about me when I asked my key people what my true genius is. Interesting part being that they pretty much all said the same thing. Hmmm. Doesn’t mean I really know what to do with it. I really enjoyed the part about “falling in love.” I’m planning to fall in love with a few subjects this year that my kids want me to teach them. I’m looking forward to it. Perhaps I’ll even throw in a few of my own. (59) “[Feelings of low self-worth]…these deep and sometimes overwhelming feelings almost always go away when you fall in love “(with anything or anyone). While these authors are speaking of the romance of learning, this statement does teach us a lot about the danger and power of teen romance. Falling in love with a person when the time (and the person) isn’t right can cause a lot of trouble. While falling in love with a subject/topic of learning is SO different! Just an interesting concept. 71) Falling in love is a skill. 73) Figuring out how to fall in love with a subject is the key to truly learning it. 61) “Consciously choose an allegiance!” –instead of having one thrust upon you by indecision or popular opinion. I loved this section. It is worth exploring whether your allegiance is to God/Good/Love; Having/Self/Ego/Power; Impressing/Others/Insecurity or Bad/Anger/Hate, and where whatever allegiance you follow leads you. 63) “Is my progress stalled by my fear of losing status or things?” 85) FASCINATING opinions on why the highly educated Japanese Americans generally acted the way they did during WWII (stoic acceptance & perseverance, sending thousands of soldiers to fight against Japan despite internment etc.) As opposed to the way the highly-trained and expert German people were easily led to do obscenely cruel things under Hitler. 89) “There is a drastic difference between the skilled expert and the truly wise (liberally educated) expert.” 86) “When something is free, find out who paid for it.” (Why is American public education free? Pure philanthropy?) And then one of the most fascinating parts of the whole book, to me was the concept that the creation of the teenager (circa 1941) simultaneously created the mid-life crisis. The midlife crisis happens when the strain of wearing a mask (or masks) created in youth by failing to find the “Real You” (as opposed to the “fake you” one becomes by default …(101), or when one becomes “tired of managing a job that wasn’t really what he wanted, or being at home with kids that she wasn’t prepared for, or living a life that wasn’t planned out but fallen into by a series of previous unexamined choices, being pressured more and more by uncommitted and unchosen demands of others and watching hidden feelings or dreams slipping away.” (emphasis added) What an interesting and poignant topic I had never really thought over before. I’ve worn “need to be seen as” masks before, it’s not a happy place. I’m finally finding the “Real Me,” and I find I’m pretty cool. Well, at least, I’m pretty cool to me and I’m happy doing the things I love, and I’m trying to do good in the world and it is well and that is what counts. Even if I’m the only one who thinks I’m cool ;) (115) “Those who thrive in times of recession, depression, slow-growth economics, even war and other major crises are the ones who focus on home, community, entrepreneurship.” So, we stink, currently on the last at our house, but we’re thinking…. 14 Financial Success Rules 1. Embrace the New & the Now (instead of clinging to old) 2. Spend evenings & Sundays with family (good, strong family relationships are key) 3. Strengthen your self-culture (find out what makes you happy & do it), instead of following popular culture 4. Articulate and write out your rules for life 5. Focus on raising adults (as opposed to children—I don’t want 36+ yo children.) 6. Make “Meaning” the focus of learning, conversation & thinking 7. Serve. Not “projects” but create community by service 8. Make marriage your central focus (married or not). Again, good relationships are key. 9. Get a leadership education. Be able to make impact. 10. Engage entrepreneurship. 11. Be a producer. (Produce wealth to do GOOD, instead of simply being a producer for others & a consumer) 12. Develop your creativity & inventiveness 13. Find your inner resiliency. Keep on trying. 14. Grow your ambition. Do great things. Some distractions: 1) I despise the use of the term "The Universe." If you mean God, say it. I cannot see how something as impersonal as "The Universe" can be inspiring to anyone. "Inner Moral Compass" or "Nature" (as Thomas Jefferson used it, MAYBE a better term, but not much). I’m not advocating religion by force here, but simply saying what we, personally, mean and leaving others to interpret as they wish. 2) I felt that in trying to be too buddy-buddy with the target audience (teens) the authors slightly missed the mark. It is my opinion that if you want a teen to take your message seriously, try to treat them as a respected mentor teaching them, not as a contemporary peer trying to cajole them. Just me. This wasn't a totally pervasive problem or totally annoying, but just a thought. 3) The 100 Book List. Why Card, Sanderson, Alcott & Austen? Once I sat in a book group discussion about "Little Women" with a number of highly intelligent and good women. Our conversation? Zilch. Nice story, but not much there. Definitely not worthy of the 100 TOP, as lovely as the stories are. Same with Austen. Don't get me wrong there, LOVE her, but discussion possibilities are small in most of them. Sure, she's a fantastic, timeless writer, but since lit is sort of a hobby of mine, I plan on introducing great writing WITH discussion value. It’s not that hard to find. As for the sci-fi—truly, I’m a fan of the good stuff like Asimov and Clarke, but Card—ick! (Love him as a person, not much respect for him as an author). I haven’t read Sanderson so I can’t say, but why? Just trying to appeal to the target audience, or personal fancy of the authors? I just don’t get how these make the grade. Seriously, I absolutely abhorred “Ender’s Game.” Like, totally lame, dude. However, I do appreciate most of the other suggestions and general guidelines. All in all, a great book for the target audience AND for those who wake up one day and say, “Wow. I am an ignoramus.” “I am totally unfulfilled and directionless.” “What am I here for?” “Is there something more than watching TV rushing my kids from one activity to another, eating McDonalds all the while??” Good thoughts, good jumping off place.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trace

    4.5 star rating. This book is going directly on a dedicated shelf of books that I deem are a priority for my son to read in a few years. A really great program for teens. The only beef I have is it seems to be slanted for homeschooled children who have more available time for 6-8 hours of personal study a day. It DOES mention what public school kids need, but gives very little information on how to juggle the demands of public school structure alongside a TJED education. Still - a very valuable 4.5 star rating. This book is going directly on a dedicated shelf of books that I deem are a priority for my son to read in a few years. A really great program for teens. The only beef I have is it seems to be slanted for homeschooled children who have more available time for 6-8 hours of personal study a day. It DOES mention what public school kids need, but gives very little information on how to juggle the demands of public school structure alongside a TJED education. Still - a very valuable resource that I will be asking my son to read in a couple of years.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Gardner Johnson

    Love the principles presented in the book, but not a fan of how it was presented. If I was a youth right now reading it I would feel that it was somehow "dumbed down" to try to appeal to me. Nevertheless, it is on the shelf for my kids to read if they so desire. "A Thomas Jefferson Education" is just much better and very approachable by youth.

  6. 4 out of 5

    JoMama

    This book should be required reading for every human! It has taught me so much about myself, and I have loved teaching my teens with it as well. I use this book extensively with the two teen groups I mentor. It is fantastic!!!! Shannon Brooks brings Oliver's writing to a level of better implementation and understanding.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John

    This is an excellent primer on life especially for teens but useful to all ages. DeMille lays out a plan for everyone to prepare intellectually to help fulfill your purpose and lead humanity to a better place. If that sounds lofty, it is. DeMille has the plan to make it all happen.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Who am I? What is the real genuine me? ‘It is said that when God wants to change to world, he sends a baby.” Sometimes the change needed to too large for just one baby, so he sends a generation. We see this in Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington. Today God needs a change to occur and I am the baby He sent, my friend is the baby He sent, my generation was sent to change the world. Others may see me as a self centered teenager who is consumed in the thing Who am I? What is the real genuine me? ‘It is said that when God wants to change to world, he sends a baby.” Sometimes the change needed to too large for just one baby, so he sends a generation. We see this in Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and George Washington. Today God needs a change to occur and I am the baby He sent, my friend is the baby He sent, my generation was sent to change the world. Others may see me as a self centered teenager who is consumed in the things of the world. But I am much more than that, I am the change in the world. I lead my education and life by doing so I lead the world. In order to get this education I cannot follow the traditional or conveyor belt, I need an education unique to me and my mission. The foundation and strength of every education depends on the quality and amount of books that you read. But just as important as reading great classics is a mentor who can hold you accountable and walk you through the lessons and teachings in the book. I am lacking mentors in my life, there are few adults who I have access to on a regular basis to who can read and discuss these types of books with me. I have a great Mom who can but I think so much like her I want someone with different experiences and life stories who can give me new insights and opinions. Many things about learning excite me that I feel very motivated to learn, read, and discuss. We know that history repeats itself and there are four big sections that we see often. 1: Founding- Family and community relationships, Entrepreneurial Ability, Initiative and leadership Skills. Societal Forms. “Build a business to change the world.” Money to retire young and relax (from entrepreneurship and/or investing) Making Sure the Right Changes Happen 2. Awakening- Big institutions, Professional Careers, Investment, Credentials and Resume, Leisure and entertainment. Job Training.“You can’t get a real Job!” Savings and security for the family (from a steady job and bank savings accounts) Personal Status 3. Unraveling -Big institutions, Professional Careers, Investment, Credentials and Resume, Leisure and entertainment. Career Training “Build a business and sell it, retire young.” Savings and security for the family (from a steady job and bank savings accounts) Personal Wealth 4. Crisis- Family and community relationships, Entrepreneurial Ability, Initiative and leadership Skills. Family and Community Forms “Entrepreneur to survive, until the economy is better.” Money to retire young and relax (from entrepreneurship and/or investing) Making Sure the Right Side Wins

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I personally think all of the TJEd books are a must read. I really enjoyed the focus of this one towards helping teens (and adults) understand how to find their real selves and progress in their leadership education journey.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kris Pace

    This would be a great book for all teens and their parents and teachers to read. It helped me gain a broader view of the necessity of deliberate learning

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    Great information. Great ideas. Great information. Great ideas. Give s you a lot to think about. I love the wayit empowers youth. The ending is a little unsettling.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Micaela Moss

    LOVED THIS BOOK!! <3

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cindi

    Alrighty, finished! I changed my rating because I have to admit that I was frustrated when I was writing before. It is difficult to be in the middle. Almost everyone I know is either adamantly in the "homeschool" crowd or equally adamant about "modern education." I can see the value to both. Also, my husband holds a position in the State Government Dept of Education. For various reasons, I wouldn't be supporting him if I decided to pull my kids out and homeschool. I really liked the ending of the Alrighty, finished! I changed my rating because I have to admit that I was frustrated when I was writing before. It is difficult to be in the middle. Almost everyone I know is either adamantly in the "homeschool" crowd or equally adamant about "modern education." I can see the value to both. Also, my husband holds a position in the State Government Dept of Education. For various reasons, I wouldn't be supporting him if I decided to pull my kids out and homeschool. I really liked the ending of the book. I loved the discussion of the Fourth Turning and plan on reading it soon. I also love the simulations in the end and I think my son will be doing some of them soonish. He is also doing the exercise of answering 22 questions in 22 days and all that follows that. I love it that he's willing to do this! Older review: I had my thirteen year old read this book. I'd say that the biggest benefit he felt was from working on the exercises in the book. He was genuinely thrilled by the responses other people gave him including his best friend who echoed what his grandfather and father had to say about his gifts and potential. Though, when I asked him if it inspired him to want to read all of those classics for a leadership education, he said "Not really." I'm about half way through and I have mixed feelings. On the one hand, I have read a couple of the other TJEd books and feel that this fills a hole and was needed. It seemed to me, after reading the others that scholar phase was somewhat of an enigma. This book spells out what happens and why with teens in this phase and provides some needed inspiration (even though my teen didn't call it inspiration, it seems inspirational to me). I find a great deal of inspiration in the TJEd method for myself. I feel that I did miss so much in my schooling years because I was the type of student who could have done just about anything, but chose to get by with just what was needed to get A's. Since I figured out the system very early on, I gypped myself (or the system gypped me if you look at it that way) of a really great education. The problem I have is that we are not homeschoolers. Though the book does address those who may be attending public or private school, it clearly (imo)demeans both of these venues. I am pleased with the education my kids are getting in school. My children attend an elementary school (K-4) that in my opinion should be the envy of every parent. It's an international school representing at least 40 different countries and more than two dozen languages. It is very open and accepting of differences, including handicapped children. Plus, the teachers are exceptional. My kids have then progressed to a wonderful 5-6 building where they have been nurtured and taught by teachers who clearly love what they do and go the extra mile. My oldest is now in Middle School and really likes it. I can see the downfalls, somewhat, in his education compared to TJEd scholar phase, but I can also see things he is getting that he might not have the opportunities for if he were homeschooled (i.e the orchestra program--I could not afford music lessons plus orchestra at this time, ditto for gym which he enjoys immensely). We are active in supplementing at home (life skills, science, nature, reading, and math above and beyond helping with homework) and I wondered if I might be able to inspire my kids to work on the classics list over the period of their teenage years with "Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens" as required reading between ages 12-13. It is an experiment I have in mind and will continue with the pursuit of it. I'm hoping that as I read classics, I may have more ideas about how to inspire and mentor the same to my children. But, what I don't have is a clear picture from the book that the authors see any value in public education. And that is something I don't like. Not everyone is able to educate their children at home. Some people, like me, want the best of both worlds and believe they can have it. I am not of the opinion that the world would be a better place if every parent were able to homeschool. So, the best I can do is try to apply the principles without becoming offended by the authors' strong bias.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    A great book to guide teens (and adults) through life and in helping to become their best selves. It was a quick read and one I definitely plan to use to help my children.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens isn't just for kids. In fact, the subtitle is: And Every Adult Who Wants to Change the World. Appropriately so. My wife and I learned about A Thomas Jefferson Education a few years ago and have been adopting the philosophy in our home. Many of our friends think it is a homeschool curriculum, but it is so much more. Thomas Jefferson Education or Leadership Education is a philosophy, really a way of life, focused on discovering the genius in each of us and nurtu Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens isn't just for kids. In fact, the subtitle is: And Every Adult Who Wants to Change the World. Appropriately so. My wife and I learned about A Thomas Jefferson Education a few years ago and have been adopting the philosophy in our home. Many of our friends think it is a homeschool curriculum, but it is so much more. Thomas Jefferson Education or Leadership Education is a philosophy, really a way of life, focused on discovering the genius in each of us and nurturing an awareness that we each have a purpose in life. The more clearly we define that purpose, the greater drive we feel to put in the effort to learn and develop and prepare for the future. It's not hard to perceive how powerful this approach would be for a teenager struggling to pay attention at school. How different the focus of our entertainment-addicted would be if they understood their role in shaping the future! You should read the book, because Oliver DeMille and Shanon Brooks explain it in an infinitely more inspiring way than my attempt. Brooks and DeMille discuss the historical trends of the rise and decline of societies. We are at a critical point in that cycle, and we need adults and youth prepared to lead effectively with integrity and a sound understanding of principles. Conventional wisdom tells us to study hard, get good grades, get a job, and save for retirement, but this approach no longer offers the security that it did in past decades. I think kids intuitively understand this considering more and more college graduates remain unemployed or underemployed. They start their adult lives with low paying jobs under a mountain of student loan debt. It's hard to have hope in that situation. I see a lot of adults coming to this realization as the most experienced professionals in their field (consequently they are often the highest paid employees) are "let go" to ease constricting budgets. It definitely shook my confidence when I saw a bunch of highly competent ICU nurses replaced by new grad nurses without that literally life saving knowledge and experience. That decision was fueled by budgetary stress when the economy took a turn for the worse. My intention is not to speak ill of professional training, but to point out that a different way of thinking is necessary in these changing times. Politics is increasingly vitriolic, families are under attack, our prison system is saturated, the state of the nation's finances is a joke. We can no longer rely on the "experts" who evidently cannot solve the problems. Actually, even if we had wise and principled leaders, if the people don't understand and get involved we will never see positive change. The key to steering our nation (and the world) through uncertainty and crisis toward prosperity and freedom is educated individuals. Not just those who have a fancy piece of paper from a university, but people who understand the questions discussed throughout the history of civilization, individuals versed in the various answers posited by philosophers and rulers, and those able to see the historical evidence of where those different routes inevitably take the societies that adopt them. But understanding alone isn't enough. Those individuals must also learn to communicate effectively. They must develop the integrity to align their thoughts and actions with truth. They need initiative and drive. And they must be wise enough to know that fixing the world is too big for any one individual or small group of individuals. We all have our role to play. What's yours? What are you doing to prepare for and fulfill that mission? This book will help.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wendee

    Excellent read for any teen or pre-teen (OR ADULT who needs guidance to GROW UP--like me.) Find the REAL YOU so you can fulfill your mission in life. Do it now! Don't waste time trying to "fit in" with others who are wearing masks... and subsequently experience mid-life crises because they discover the masks are unsustainable. Oliver DeMille and Shanon Brooks inspire the reader to get a great education to prepare him to be the best real self he can be and fulfill the mission that he was sent here Excellent read for any teen or pre-teen (OR ADULT who needs guidance to GROW UP--like me.) Find the REAL YOU so you can fulfill your mission in life. Do it now! Don't waste time trying to "fit in" with others who are wearing masks... and subsequently experience mid-life crises because they discover the masks are unsustainable. Oliver DeMille and Shanon Brooks inspire the reader to get a great education to prepare him to be the best real self he can be and fulfill the mission that he was sent here to fulfill. The reader is walked through the process of self-discovery and reminded the importance of God, parents, grandparents, and other adult mentors in his life decisions. Don't pass up the opportunity to read this one, especially if you are in your teens or you know and love a teenager. Merged review: I read this book to Amber while she drove us each day to seminary in January. It was an assignment for a workshop she participated in and she was not finding the time to read it to herself. I'm really grateful that we had the opportunity to experience that book together. It opened a lot of doors in our relationship. This is a fun read written for teens. Brooks and DeMille encourage the reader to think deeply about the implication of choices and education for one's individual mission in life. They inspire the reader to not settle for a mediocre education, but to get the best education they can get that will prepare them for a meaningful life of purpose. A few times they tell the reader to put the book down and really think about this and write what they feel down. It is so important for teens to find their identity (it will affect everything they do in life) that they came up with 20+ questions about life and purpose to answer, but don't do it all at once, these are big questions that deserve at least a full day of thought. We are still working on the "Question of the Day" exercise and it has evoked some interesting conversations. Bottom line, align yourself with God first and you will succeed in life--far better than you can imagine. Those whose allegiance is to self, others, or evil will reap ugly consequences. And that is the dire need of this rising generation--to be connected to God. The future of our country and our world depend on it. Brilliantly executed, this is a must read for every teen and every parent.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    This book doesn't have much new for me, but groups everything together perfectly for my kids. It goes through the basics of TJed, explains that they are in charge of their own education and that we are in a Fourth Turning and need them to be amazing leaders to rise up and lead us through it. There is a new 100+40 reading list that has many familiar books and introduces some new books that we can't wait to read. It has a step by step guide to help the reader ponder and focus on what they are good This book doesn't have much new for me, but groups everything together perfectly for my kids. It goes through the basics of TJed, explains that they are in charge of their own education and that we are in a Fourth Turning and need them to be amazing leaders to rise up and lead us through it. There is a new 100+40 reading list that has many familiar books and introduces some new books that we can't wait to read. It has a step by step guide to help the reader ponder and focus on what they are good at and want in life. A great kick start to finding their mission. Many adults need this part. DeMille and Brooks list the skills needed on how to be successful in a Fourth Turning which came from a talk DeMille gave in 2009. An appendix has a bunch of simulations to try. The following quote sums the message up: "It is said that when God wants to change the world, he sends a baby- perfectly timed to grow, learn, prepare and then take action at the right moment. But there are times when one baby won't suffice, when the challenges facing the world are just too great; and so instead of a great reformer or a few key thinkers, what is needed is a whole generation of leaders. This happened in the sixth century BC, and in the first decade of the Common Era, then again the the American founding generation. We believe it is happening again today..." I believe this fully and passionately too.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Taylene

    History continues to go through a cycle. Every 100 years (give or take 20) our society tends to make it through four different "seasons". Season 1: The Founding Season 2: The Awakening Season 3: The Unraveling Season 4: The Crisis (For more information on this subject read The Fourth Turning by Strauss and Howe. They researched over 3,000 years of history and found this cycle to be consistent) Guess where we are?! That's right. Smack dab in the middle of Crisis. It began with 9/11 and continues with t History continues to go through a cycle. Every 100 years (give or take 20) our society tends to make it through four different "seasons". Season 1: The Founding Season 2: The Awakening Season 3: The Unraveling Season 4: The Crisis (For more information on this subject read The Fourth Turning by Strauss and Howe. They researched over 3,000 years of history and found this cycle to be consistent) Guess where we are?! That's right. Smack dab in the middle of Crisis. It began with 9/11 and continues with the current decline in our economy, We are facing some tough times ahead. Duh! Right? We've all figured that out by now (I think). But, have you figured out how to survive in our current season of Crisis? Or how we can make the upcoming season of Founding a successful one? If your answer is no (and even if your answer is yes) you need to read this book. Especially if you are a teenager or the parent of one. Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens outlines what our youth need to do to prepare for and survive through the Crisis and Founding seasons of our country. And the advice is great for adults as well who are NOT narrow-minded and set in their ways. Having lived in a time of Awakening and Unraveling most adults have the wrong philosophy for how to survive in current times. This book can help you break down your paradigms and actually help you and your teen thrive in these difficult seasons. Highly recommend this book. It is an easy read (I read it in 2 days).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    Excellent Read. Makes you want to go out and change the world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Mccants

    There is a lot of indisputably great advice in this book, and it is quite motivating in tone. There is little to argue with in the beginning – fall in love with learning, take charge of your education, read classic books, find a mentor. However, this book becomes quite prescriptive, and the premise upon which the detailed recommendations are based is revealed towards the end to be The Fourth Turning by Strauss and Howe. Perhaps there is legitimacy to generational seasons and resulting speculatio There is a lot of indisputably great advice in this book, and it is quite motivating in tone. There is little to argue with in the beginning – fall in love with learning, take charge of your education, read classic books, find a mentor. However, this book becomes quite prescriptive, and the premise upon which the detailed recommendations are based is revealed towards the end to be The Fourth Turning by Strauss and Howe. Perhaps there is legitimacy to generational seasons and resulting speculations, but in the end they are just speculations, not the solid pillars on which one might want to rely for something as important as an educational philosophy. On the contrary, TJEd for Teens has this as an underlying foundation, with a goal to prepare for the upcoming change in “generational season”. In this book that focuses on urging the reader to read more books, there is an abundance of recommendations of the authors’ other works as additional reading. This gives the impression of a very closed system, belonging to the authors only and being anything but collaborative. Many of the writings and recommended resources are intended to have the reader think beyond the established educational institution, but with the abundance of self-created resources intended to help readers “do” this method, the argument could be made that one is exchanging one institution for another.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book was so inspiring! This is a book to help you discover and be the "REAL YOU". It empowers youth to understand that not only are they truly great, but that they can do great things. It covers how to find your mission in life, and how to live with deliberate purpose to accomplish your goals. I will give a copy of this book to each of my kids as they turn into teens and begin their "Scholar Phase". This book is important for parents to read with their children. It teaches you how to be a be This book was so inspiring! This is a book to help you discover and be the "REAL YOU". It empowers youth to understand that not only are they truly great, but that they can do great things. It covers how to find your mission in life, and how to live with deliberate purpose to accomplish your goals. I will give a copy of this book to each of my kids as they turn into teens and begin their "Scholar Phase". This book is important for parents to read with their children. It teaches you how to be a better mentor, and it helps the children be able to get more benefits from the what their parents can give. What I appreciated most in this book was: A great reading list for teens to start from to build their character and get a great leadership education. Several places to write notes in the book to help the kids discover what they came here on earth to accomplish. Many of the chapters have "Homework" assignments. The list of "Missions" and the list of the 23 great TEEN questions that all people (no matter HOW old) must answer for themselves to understand who they REALLY are so that when they are 45 they don't suffer a midlife crisis. I wish I had had this book when I was a teenager!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stan

    This is a companion volume to A Thomas Jefferson Education and A Thomas Jefferson Education Home Companion, but it is written specifically to teens. In A Thomas Jefferson Education Oliver DeMille lays out a structure for a truly great education, not technical training for a job or even for a professional career, but vast and deep education using the great thinkers throughout the history of the world. And not just in math and science, but in every area of human endeavor. It's the type of educatio This is a companion volume to A Thomas Jefferson Education and A Thomas Jefferson Education Home Companion, but it is written specifically to teens. In A Thomas Jefferson Education Oliver DeMille lays out a structure for a truly great education, not technical training for a job or even for a professional career, but vast and deep education using the great thinkers throughout the history of the world. And not just in math and science, but in every area of human endeavor. It's the type of education Thomas Jefferson received from mentors like George Wythe and others. In Thomas Jefferson Education for Teens he and Shannon Brooks write directly to teens about taking responsibility for their education, about developing a love for learning, and about being true to themselves—finding what is really important, what is most highly valued, and then living to those values. The three books are not a sequence, each book develops the idea of gaining a truly great education, but each book is written to a different audience. That said, there is still benefit in reading all three.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leiloni Schulz

    "Look for meaning in everything, and you'll often find it." The premise of this book is amazing: "-Freedom is when you don't care how you look to others, who gets the credit for the good you do, or what others think of you; but rather you focus on what is right and how you cna help others feel happy. . . - God/good is trying to get your attention right now and has some important things to tell you, so listen up. . . - You don't have to know where you are going as long as you are following the right "Look for meaning in everything, and you'll often find it." The premise of this book is amazing: "-Freedom is when you don't care how you look to others, who gets the credit for the good you do, or what others think of you; but rather you focus on what is right and how you cna help others feel happy. . . - God/good is trying to get your attention right now and has some important things to tell you, so listen up. . . - You don't have to know where you are going as long as you are following the right allegiance. . . - You don't have to struggle and claw your way to the top because the journey is the main event. To love, serve, help, have fun and feel happy along the way are the whole point. . . - You don't have to set a timetable as long as you are doing the right things, because God, the Universe have it all worked out better than you could plan it anyway - so relax, keep doing your best, and smile a lot. . ." It would have been easier to understand more of this book if I had read the Fourth Turning first.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

    Am I in trouble for rating a TJED book less than four stars? ;) Let me explain myself. I didn't find this incredibly inspiring. But I agree with almost everything the authors said. Quite a few times I didn't think they proved or explained their point well enough. Also, in the notes it said that "the authors used enallage (the purposeful suspension of grammatical or other rules of writing) when they felt it would more effectively communicate with the audience or more clearly make a point." (I loo Am I in trouble for rating a TJED book less than four stars? ;) Let me explain myself. I didn't find this incredibly inspiring. But I agree with almost everything the authors said. Quite a few times I didn't think they proved or explained their point well enough. Also, in the notes it said that "the authors used enallage (the purposeful suspension of grammatical or other rules of writing) when they felt it would more effectively communicate with the audience or more clearly make a point." (I looked up "enallage," and it's not a word.) In my opinion, good writers should be able to communicate and articulate their points just as well, if not more clearly, when using correct grammar rules as opposed to purposefully or unconsciously breaking them. Furthermore, I don't think they should have used "enallage" if they considered their topic to be as serious as they seemed to portray it to be.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike Bercier

    I really enjoyed reading this book, especially the chapter on success in the next 20 years. It will be important to train to become entrepreneurs and not become educated and trained for a job. We are at a time where we need to be training future leaders. There are 14 steps that will help guide us towards this better future for not only us but the world. "On the best day of your life, you'll know and live the truth that your happiness is entirely up to you-and controlled entirely by your thoughts I really enjoyed reading this book, especially the chapter on success in the next 20 years. It will be important to train to become entrepreneurs and not become educated and trained for a job. We are at a time where we need to be training future leaders. There are 14 steps that will help guide us towards this better future for not only us but the world. "On the best day of your life, you'll know and live the truth that your happiness is entirely up to you-and controlled entirely by your thoughts and commitments, and nothing else."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    This book was much better than the home companion book, as far as what to do with highschoolers (age 13+). I read the whole book in a day. Chapter 7, "Success in the next 20 years" was my favorite and was very enlightening on why leadership education is more important now because of the unstable gov't. Read the chapter to understand yourself. It's hard to condense and keep it's impact. Now I would like to read DeMille's "The Coming Aristocracy." Oh, and the teen 100 books list was wonderful too.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    So Good! Not just a simplified version of the original TJED book. Even as an adult I benefited so much from reading it. I want to buy copies for every teen I know. So inspiring and empowering. The teen 100 book list is awesome. My husband and I have decided to work on the list together. I love that it is broken up in a sort of sequence but not in an exact 1,2,3 fashion. I can't wait for the tjedforteens.com website to be up and running. The resources sound great. When Isabel is ready for scholar So Good! Not just a simplified version of the original TJED book. Even as an adult I benefited so much from reading it. I want to buy copies for every teen I know. So inspiring and empowering. The teen 100 book list is awesome. My husband and I have decided to work on the list together. I love that it is broken up in a sort of sequence but not in an exact 1,2,3 fashion. I can't wait for the tjedforteens.com website to be up and running. The resources sound great. When Isabel is ready for scholar phase we will get her a personal copy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marni

    I really enjoyed reading this book. It's a motivating view on education and how teens can be more involved in and own their own education. At this point in my life the descriptions of scholar phase are like a beautiful dream that I so want to be a part of, taking hours a day to study what I am interested in. Also talks about finding your personal mission, with a list of questions to think about who you are. Includes a great book list as well with suggestions by age and explanations of three leve I really enjoyed reading this book. It's a motivating view on education and how teens can be more involved in and own their own education. At this point in my life the descriptions of scholar phase are like a beautiful dream that I so want to be a part of, taking hours a day to study what I am interested in. Also talks about finding your personal mission, with a list of questions to think about who you are. Includes a great book list as well with suggestions by age and explanations of three levels of reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Trina

    I loved reading this, even though I'm not a teen, but I am the parent of a couple of teens. I would really recommend it to everyone. Especially enjoyable after reading 'Weapons of Mass Instruction,' by John Taylor Gatto. That one was the what-is-wrong-with-the-current-education-system. This one was the what-to-do-instead. Very inspiring! And of course now I have a about a hundred and fifty new books I want to read beacause of it!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Molly Christensen

    I liked this a lot more than I thought I would. (I guess I was kind of turned off by the author giving a workshop and continually saying to read his book for more info.) Interestingly, the book almost seems "dumbed down" for teens. However, it still has a lot of great tips and ideas and the book list is a nice start. I also liked that they really encouraged teens to turn to their parents to be their #1 mentors and guides.

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