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Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America (Technology, Education--Connections) (Technology, Education - Connections (The TEC Series))

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Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology How can we keep children safe in an uncertain world, but also raise them to be confident in taking the healthy, emotional risks necessary to succeed in life? The authors of this unique booktwo clinical psychologists, who are also mothersprovide essential guidance for parents and teachers. They explain, step-by-step, how to help Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology How can we keep children safe in an uncertain world, but also raise them to be confident in taking the healthy, emotional risks necessary to succeed in life? The authors of this unique booktwo clinical psychologists, who are also mothersprovide essential guidance for parents and teachers. They explain, step-by-step, how to help children become successful risk-takers: ready to leap at lifes opportu... Full description


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Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology How can we keep children safe in an uncertain world, but also raise them to be confident in taking the healthy, emotional risks necessary to succeed in life? The authors of this unique booktwo clinical psychologists, who are also mothersprovide essential guidance for parents and teachers. They explain, step-by-step, how to help Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology How can we keep children safe in an uncertain world, but also raise them to be confident in taking the healthy, emotional risks necessary to succeed in life? The authors of this unique booktwo clinical psychologists, who are also mothersprovide essential guidance for parents and teachers. They explain, step-by-step, how to help children become successful risk-takers: ready to leap at lifes opportu... Full description

30 review for Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America (Technology, Education--Connections) (Technology, Education - Connections (The TEC Series))

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erino

    The authors' vision for education in light of technology was interesting and pragmatic, but research on teachers was lacking and sweeping generalizations were often made. I'd like to read a book about how teachers can be tapped to aid politicians, educational leaders and families in creating this new vision for education.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trung Trinh

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Current technology gives rise to a flexible educational environment and allows "just in time" learning. Questions for the traditional educational model hence arise: is the traditional universal schooling still good (homeschooling where parents know what they are doing can be even better than public schooling where both fund and personal attention are lacking)? What curriculum to adopt - teaching general knowledge human civilization has amassed over history or our time's trendy skill sets, what l Current technology gives rise to a flexible educational environment and allows "just in time" learning. Questions for the traditional educational model hence arise: is the traditional universal schooling still good (homeschooling where parents know what they are doing can be even better than public schooling where both fund and personal attention are lacking)? What curriculum to adopt - teaching general knowledge human civilization has amassed over history or our time's trendy skill sets, what learning and teaching method to adopt (video games can be more educationally effective than some textbooks), what criteria to assess education quality ("provide skills needed in the work force or be liberal artsy"), more teachers or more machines (having one expert or multiple sources of knowledge) and so on. Motivation, customization of learning content, career and personal development and the transition or incorporation of lifelong learning were insightful. But it's not like technology has just been around since yesterday. It's certainly important to ask about the implications of technology with regards to education, but it's also equally or even more important to ask why we still see limited technological progression in education in the past 10-20 years (cost and access, classroom mgmt, what computers can't teach - inspiration, ). Does technological advancement guarantee educational equality ? Can technological advancement solve the shortage of educators/teachers?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America, by Allan Collins and Richard Halverson presents a clear look at the way technological advances have changed education in America and are continuing to challenge that same system. The book is free of jargon or complicated discourse. Instead, it presents a logical argument of why we should rethink our public school system. The experience of Collins and Halverson as professors in the history of education Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology: The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America, by Allan Collins and Richard Halverson presents a clear look at the way technological advances have changed education in America and are continuing to challenge that same system. The book is free of jargon or complicated discourse. Instead, it presents a logical argument of why we should rethink our public school system. The experience of Collins and Halverson as professors in the history of education reform is clear in the solid foundation upon which they build their argument. The book gives a clear picture of how the American education system has evolved and how that evolution is impacting the current conflict between the “establishment” and technology. At the same time, their experience in educational policy analysis gives weight to their discussion of possible reforms. They do not offer pie in the sky idea, but acknowledge the struggles that education is facing and will continue to face. They do not try to argue whether technology is changing education; they accept the change as an indisputable truth. The authors also do not claim that this revolution is neither wholly good nor wholly evil. In fact, the first half of the work attempts to describe the current educational situation, with the positive and negative consequences of technological advances and influences, as well as the reasons behind the current struggle in public education to adapt to technological advancements. The second half of the novel looks at likely developments in education, its possible effects, and how to rethink education in an increasingly technological world. The book opens with an overview of education and the effect that technology has already had. The authors discuss the way in which schooling and learning have become synonymous over time and how communities are shifting from communities of location to communities of choice. The book then looks at the changing landscape of education from the perspective of a technology enthusiast and that of a technology skeptic. These two chapters offer a balanced look at education, acknowledging that there are two sides to the issue. Technology (particularly computers, tablets, and cell phones) offers increased opportunities for customization, just-in-time learning, global interactions, and increased student interest and engagement with content through games and with others through multimedia and internet publication. According to enthusiasts, technology is going to revolutionize education, maybe not tomorrow, but in the not-to-distant future. On the other hand, skeptics argue that schools have become inflexible and rigid. They resist change, and have been resisting the technological transformation enthusiasts have been predicting for years. They argue that technology and public education are incompatible, that the standardization and broadening of public schools has limited the way in which technology can be successfully and meaningfully implemented. Their argument can be summed up with “School fosters just-in-case learning while technology fosters just-in-time learning” (Collins 48). The following three chapters take a closer look at how American schools have evolved from the apprenticeship system to universal schooling. While this is not a new observation, it is important to understand that our public education system developed after the industrial revolution in response to the growing need for basic reading, writing, mathematical skills, and later civic responsibility. Standardized testing and the social attitude that supports it did not appear out of nowhere. Over time this system has become an institution that has lost much of its flexibility. There are outside forces, however, that are pushing public schools to make changes, from homeschooling, educational videos, and distance education to workplace education, computer-based education software, and technical certification. Education is moving towards the concept of life-long learning. Unfortunately, this movement brings the idea of equal access to the forefront. As technology plays a more important role, the “haves” will have a distinct advantage over the “have nots.” In order to maintain the equity at the heart of the American educational system, policy makers will need to ensure that all students have access to the technology that will play an increasingly key role. Although many students may struggle to access technology, those that do will participate in an enhanced learning experience that will keep them engaged while offering augmented individualization. In the end, educators cannot pretend that the world hasn’t changed, that technology isn’t important. They need to accept that technology is a part of our reality and respond accordingly, understanding the imperatives driving change, embracing its possibilities, and preparing for the inevitable challenges those changes bring. According to the authors, schools need to shift from standardized assessment to performance-based assessment that focus on the certification of academic, generic, and technical skills. Students should be given options about which certification to pursue. While there would still be core requirements, students would be given more autonomy in selecting their classes, creating their own fields of specialization. To do this, schools would need to completely redesign their curriculum and find a way to address the very real disparity in access to cutting-edge technology. Ultimately, Collins and Halverson offer a new view of education, one that looks at current technology and technological trends and requires a new attitude toward learning, motivation, careers, and the role of government in education. The result is a future in which technology leaders, educators, parents, and all citizens work together to create an educational system that embraces the capacity of new informational technologies with the flexibility to continue to adapt to the needs of students of the future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maggie M

    Read for one of my grad classes this semester. It's not my typical fare, but I definitely found it thought-provoking. I'd recommend to anyone interested in the intersection of tech and K-12 ed policy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm trying to get this review out in a coherent and logical manner, but my mind is messed up because I just finished reading it. Okay, so. I wasn't that impressed with this book. One of the major problems with technology books (especially as they pertain to education) is that they're outdated the minute they're published. It's really only a problem if the book insists on being specific on the kinds of technology. This one isn't as egregious as another I read last year, but I cringed quite a bit w I'm trying to get this review out in a coherent and logical manner, but my mind is messed up because I just finished reading it. Okay, so. I wasn't that impressed with this book. One of the major problems with technology books (especially as they pertain to education) is that they're outdated the minute they're published. It's really only a problem if the book insists on being specific on the kinds of technology. This one isn't as egregious as another I read last year, but I cringed quite a bit when it referenced Internet cafes. While those are more prevalent in other countries, this book discusses education and technology in America. I haven't seen an Internet cafe in at least 15 years. But that's not my major complaint. Collins and Halverson had a fair enough thesis, that the American educational system is archaic, that the classroom hasn't changed in a hundred years while other things certainly have. Like the telephone, like everything. That we're not preparing our children for the workforce (oh my god *cringe* because that's the only reason to go to school?). That we don't incorporate enough technology to help our students realize their full learning potential. That we don't cater to them enough. And though the problem stems from attitude and a cultural bias when it comes to our older generation, it's not just an attitude problem. The authors had a difficult time across the board defining more than one obstacle for each of their points. Their arguments had many holes in them and were always assumptions that could not be forgiven. It's easy to say "this needs to be improved" and then ignore the obstacles that could and would get in the way. It was far too idealistic to be helpful. The fact is that while some schools might have the abilities to implement more technology and teach their students using appropriate technology, other schools have a difficult time just getting outdated computers into their buildings. Every classroom in my children's school has a Smart Board, but every teacher complains about them. If they're not impossible to use, they're inconvenient to use, and if they're nice to use, god forbid if they break down. Everything is dependent on it. And administration refuses to keep enough things in storage like replacement light bulbs. The problem is much deeper than the book seems to acknowledge. We have to convince districts, parents, community members, politicians, etc. It's not impossible, and I don't necessarily think the book says we have to have it done NOW (more that we need to get started now, which is true). But the onus seems to be on the wrong folks. The question keeps coming to mind: are the more important things at the moment to focus on? But there always are. The book does begin to criticize stupid policy like NCLB and standardized testing, but largely stays out of politics, which is a shame because that's what public schooling is. We can't be afraid of politics. We've gotta be willing to get a little dirty. This book did not talk about anything of this nature. Ugh, there are so many problems I had with this book. I'll end with this one: Chapters 1-7 is an exercise in repetition and 8-9 are actually maybe interesting. Then it ends. And you celebrate with a few drinks because my god it's over. I don't feel enlightened after reading this. I feel like I've wasted a ton of time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hanawald

    I wish I found more in this book that was new, because I really wanted to. I found it to be a more intellectual approach to the topics introduced in Disrupting Class. To that end, the authors write in a much more scholarly (and much less accessible) way. I'm mostly going to focus in this review on what I liked best. Towards the end, the authors discuss what might be lost when technology permits an education system more like that also described in Disrupting Class. The things they worry might be I wish I found more in this book that was new, because I really wanted to. I found it to be a more intellectual approach to the topics introduced in Disrupting Class. To that end, the authors write in a much more scholarly (and much less accessible) way. I'm mostly going to focus in this review on what I liked best. Towards the end, the authors discuss what might be lost when technology permits an education system more like that also described in Disrupting Class. The things they worry might be lost are not simple. Public education, and some independent education, for all its flaws is "the institution that fosters equity more than any other institution in America." The workplace cannot provide this and if technology leads to the end of school as a social structure (a point I'm not sure I agree will happen) where will students encounter and learn about people who are not just like them? The authors refer to this as the "Balkanization" of education. I was pleased that the authors recognized the importance of MMOGs, but I got the sense that they'd never played one before (full disclosure, nor have I for more than a few minutes). I got the same sense reading the parts about social networking (something I'm quite involved in). The authors felt that members of an online class would not form relationships beyond the borders of class assignments. Considering the number of people I do have relationships with that are primarily online, I was dismayed. Ventures such as the Online School for Girls and Duke's TIP online learning opportunities are counting on online experiences providing much of the affect aspect of school that is currently part of the classroom experience. There's a great deal of food for thought throughout the book. Not much that's new, but its put together in a way that is thought-provoking. For example, the authors describe the balance between classic and progressive education as a compromise resulting in content instruction organized in classical disciplines but without the rigor or context. The result is weaker than either of the two approaches in isolation.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Really nice job of setting up the fundamental idea that each major earth shattering invention redefines what education looks like. Hypothesis is that computers/Internet are such a huge game changer that the current education system is on its deathbed. Nice logical conclusion, no idea if it's true yet. Couple of frustrations. I get really tired of people who say, like these guys, "teachers are too old and set in their ways, they don't have a chance." It's totally not true. I know a bunch of great Really nice job of setting up the fundamental idea that each major earth shattering invention redefines what education looks like. Hypothesis is that computers/Internet are such a huge game changer that the current education system is on its deathbed. Nice logical conclusion, no idea if it's true yet. Couple of frustrations. I get really tired of people who say, like these guys, "teachers are too old and set in their ways, they don't have a chance." It's totally not true. I know a bunch of great educators who are in their last year's before retirement completely pushing for innovation. Most teachers will gladly change teaching strategies if they can see the value in it. Second, it's hard to read, "this will kill schools" for the 5962 time and see them still going strong. I remember someone saying the Laser Disc (the giant CD like things) would replace teachers. I guess if you cry wolf enough, you'll be right once, but com'on. Last, this book certainly passes the Fr. Jim Heft, "licks finger and reads the wind" test. Meaning this author is good at reading the situation and pointing out the problem, but had absolutely no clue what the solution is. It's tough for me to get behind someone who spends and entire book analyzing why schooling as we know it is now worthless and then goes, "hope we figure it out! Deuces" I try to advocate technology in the class room, there are huge opportunities we miss out on. If you push me on the the right day I will even agree that math education as we know it is a catastrophe, but that's too big for this time. But, I will never understand people who think teachers can be replaced by machine. It's like saying we don't need doctors because webMD can do it all. Just stop it already!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Corrie Campbell

    Collins & Halverson step back and take broad view of where education has come from before then moving forward and prognosticating on the future of education "in the age of technology." I think they wisely have chapters early on called "The Technology Enthusiasts' Argument" and "The Technology Skeptics' Argument" to sort of level the playing field for biases and assumptions before moving forward and describing the benefits and pitfalls that technology will possibly bring to the field of educa Collins & Halverson step back and take broad view of where education has come from before then moving forward and prognosticating on the future of education "in the age of technology." I think they wisely have chapters early on called "The Technology Enthusiasts' Argument" and "The Technology Skeptics' Argument" to sort of level the playing field for biases and assumptions before moving forward and describing the benefits and pitfalls that technology will possibly bring to the field of education. Every policy maker, teacher and parent would be better off reading this before making a judgment about any plans to change education - least they fall victim to the pitfalls and miss out on the benefits that technology can bring to the field of education. A short read too -- only 145 pages and not too technical.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This book provides a clear overview of how technology is affecting education at the present, and uses historical precedent to predict how it may influence education in the future. It identifies both the potential and the pitfalls of technology for learning, and suggests ways that we might capitalize on the former and avoid the latter. It's an excellent book to contextualize the present state of edtech for newcomers to the field.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I respected their even handed approach to laying out both sides and the middle ground. I did not agree with everything, but was surprised at how much I did agree with. I will probably blog on a few key points.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    I had to read this book as part of my graduate course. It certainly made me think about how and why we should be utilizing technology in our classrooms. The authors new vision for the future of our educational system is interesting to think about.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Not a bad little read. Let about tech and more about the history of education and educational reform movement. Contradictions to how technology can help and the limitations of CMC, but this was also published in 2010 which gets dated as more technology emerges. I would recommend!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    interesting ideas, I don't agree with many of the solutions that are presented, but the problem is real and I appreciate the discussion and effort to find solutions. It would be interesting to see what the authors think now 7 years later.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lyddie

    The author made a few good points, and tried to be balanced about the good and bad of educational technology, but by the end his ideas for improvements in education did not address practical concerns sufficiently and were unpersuasive.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    doesn't give a lot of specifics, but it is a nice review of the philosophical history of education in america -- how it's changed over the years and how it will change in the future. some definite food for thought here.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    An essential resource for thinking about and discussing technology in education. The authors provide a thorough history of what has come regarding schooling and how it is not a good fit with our knowledge society. This book is not outdated; the concepts and critiques are just as relevant today.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Very thought provoking - inspired to be in the "Knowledge Revolution" - after seeing how the world changed after the "Industrial Revolution"

  18. 4 out of 5

    Budd Turner

    Another book showing current education fixated on the standard testing empire, overlooking orientation of digital natives that have evolved beyond that assembly line production paradym.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angela Brewington

    The authors propose some radical ideas for the way technology could mold education in the future. It will be interesting to see if they are correct in their predictions or not.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A simple book. Required reading. Nothing to blow me away.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robin Stansel

    This book made me glad that our family is unschooling. It introduced concepts of "just in time" learning, customization, and "scaffolding" to me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Warren

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lesley Wreyford

  24. 4 out of 5

    Susan Detrie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Todd Williamson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Will

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  30. 5 out of 5

    Richard Mann

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