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Fear of Missing Out

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Everyone has a fear of missing out on something--a party, a basketball game, a hangout after school. But what if it's life that you'll be missing out on? When Astrid learns that her cancer has returned, she hears about a radical technology called cryopreservation that may allow her to have her body frozen until a future time when--and if--a cure is available. With her boyfr Everyone has a fear of missing out on something--a party, a basketball game, a hangout after school. But what if it's life that you'll be missing out on? When Astrid learns that her cancer has returned, she hears about a radical technology called cryopreservation that may allow her to have her body frozen until a future time when--and if--a cure is available. With her boyfriend, Mohit, and her best friend, Chloe, Astrid goes on a road trip in search of that possibility. To see if it's real. To see if it's worth it. For fear of missing out on everything.


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Everyone has a fear of missing out on something--a party, a basketball game, a hangout after school. But what if it's life that you'll be missing out on? When Astrid learns that her cancer has returned, she hears about a radical technology called cryopreservation that may allow her to have her body frozen until a future time when--and if--a cure is available. With her boyfr Everyone has a fear of missing out on something--a party, a basketball game, a hangout after school. But what if it's life that you'll be missing out on? When Astrid learns that her cancer has returned, she hears about a radical technology called cryopreservation that may allow her to have her body frozen until a future time when--and if--a cure is available. With her boyfriend, Mohit, and her best friend, Chloe, Astrid goes on a road trip in search of that possibility. To see if it's real. To see if it's worth it. For fear of missing out on everything.

30 review for Fear of Missing Out

  1. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Rating: 4.5 Stars Astrid was lucky. She beat cancer once, but it appeared that cancer wasn't done with her, and this time, fighting back seemed futile. • Pro: I instantly fell in love with each and every one of these characters. Astrid was a no brainer, but I also adored Mohit, her mom, and her little brother. I wanted to group hug with them, because I had just met Astrid and couldn't bear to lose her. • Pro: No sugarcoating, this book got tough towards the end. I am actually crying right now, bu Rating: 4.5 Stars Astrid was lucky. She beat cancer once, but it appeared that cancer wasn't done with her, and this time, fighting back seemed futile. • Pro: I instantly fell in love with each and every one of these characters. Astrid was a no brainer, but I also adored Mohit, her mom, and her little brother. I wanted to group hug with them, because I had just met Astrid and couldn't bear to lose her. • Pro: No sugarcoating, this book got tough towards the end. I am actually crying right now, but no worries, it was not all sad, downer stuff, because this story was filled with so much love, and Wow! What a testament about the life Astrid lived, that she was surrounded by so many people, who love her that much. • Pro: The right to die is quite a touchy subject, and I really appreciated the way McGovern handled it. The approach was honest, emotional, and thought provoking. • Pro: My heart broke over and over again for Astrid, and I hated that she was in this situation, but I admired her strength and her openness with her loved ones, and her determination to decide how she would spend her final days. • Pro: I remember thinking, how lucky Astrid was to have experienced something as wonderful as her relationship with Mohit. Their love and affection for each other was a beautiful thing, and I was glad we had that, as well as her friendship with Chloe, because it helped me get through the really sad parts. • Pro: McGovern didn't only let us view Astrid's pain and grief. We also got to see how her illness affected all those around her, and how they handled it. Overall: An emotional, beautiful, and thoughtful story about one girl's struggle with terminal illness, and the choices she was faced with. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  2. 4 out of 5

    PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps

    Astrid is dying of a brain tumor. Her boyfriend Mohit and mother think a clinical trial will save her, but even Astrid’s oncologist doesn’t agree. Astrid considers cryopreservation, freezing her body until a cure is found sometime in the future, which comes at a hefty price. Her best friend Chloe suggests crowdfunding with unforeseen consequences. The Internet always has an opinion. I loved Astrid and her morbid sense of humor. I’m a cancer survivor and know inappropriate humor is therapeutic. I Astrid is dying of a brain tumor. Her boyfriend Mohit and mother think a clinical trial will save her, but even Astrid’s oncologist doesn’t agree. Astrid considers cryopreservation, freezing her body until a cure is found sometime in the future, which comes at a hefty price. Her best friend Chloe suggests crowdfunding with unforeseen consequences. The Internet always has an opinion. I loved Astrid and her morbid sense of humor. I’m a cancer survivor and know inappropriate humor is therapeutic. I can also see how her mom and boyfriend wouldn’t like it, but we do what we have to do to survive. FEAR OF MISSING OUT addresses an important aspect of living with and dying of cancer. Whose life is it? Do we live for our loved ones or ourselves? And how old do we have to be to decide when to forgo treatment? As we creep closer to death, as a young or old person, the choices we get to make become fewer and more important. I didn’t like Mohit and his relationship with Astrid, but loved BFF Chloe and her never ending support for Astrid. Astrid’s mom was also a great character. When I was growing up many people believed that Walt Disney had himself preserved for a future cure. People swore by the story, pre Internet, so fact checking was more difficult. Spoiler alert: he didn’t. The idea of freezing the body for the future is both fascinating and terrifying. Kate McGovern didn’t think through the cryopreservation lab, which froze bodies at the moment of death. Cancer kills the body and all it’s parts, including the organs. By the time the individual dies, almost nothing in the body works so unfreezing the cancer patient to cure the brain tumor wouldn’t be feasible if the rest of the body was shot. For the cryopreservation to work, it’s have to happen before the organs started to go, while the patient had a lot of life left to live. FEAR OF MISSING OUT is a quick, enjoyable and flawed read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Fetters

    "We’re the ones who will be left behind to live with an Astrid-shaped hole in the universe. We don’t want to lose you before we have to. And it isn’t fair to ask us to.” This will be one of the hardest books to review in my opinion. Astrid’s story hit really close to home and reminded me of how things went a short time ago. It brought so many emotions out of me that I wound up crying my eyes out but it also brought me comfort in knowing that no one is suffering any more. Astrid thought that she w "We’re the ones who will be left behind to live with an Astrid-shaped hole in the universe. We don’t want to lose you before we have to. And it isn’t fair to ask us to.” This will be one of the hardest books to review in my opinion. Astrid’s story hit really close to home and reminded me of how things went a short time ago. It brought so many emotions out of me that I wound up crying my eyes out but it also brought me comfort in knowing that no one is suffering any more. Astrid thought that she was in remission but some serious symptoms send her back to the Doctor and she hears the devastating truth. Her cancer is back and they may have limited options. They can attempt chemo again and see if she qualifies for a clinical study but nothing is a promise. When Astrid hears about this new scientific study, Cryopreservation, she is ready to learn more and travel to Arizona to see the facility. With the help of the internet and her vlog, crowd funding helps her, her boyfriend and best friend make their way to Arizona to do just that. Astrid has a fear of missing out on life for the now and the future. Will this new break in science be the answer she’s looking for? Or will the inevitable take over? This was devastating, beautiful, and it broke my heart all over again. No one really understands what goes through your mind when your life is controlled by an illness and this sheds a lot of light on that. I wanted a different outcome but that wouldn’t have been the honest truth. Fear of Missing Out was a fantastic book but not for the unstable. If you recently lost someone to cancer, this may not be the right book to read right now. I’m saying this from experience because I felt as if I’m reliving that day all over again. But definitely give this book a try because it’s one of the best in this genre. Just promise to live your life to the fullest and be happy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Belle Ellrich

    I'm going to be brutally honest here and say that I was not the biggest fan of this book. In fact, I think I'm being a little overly nice with the rating I'm giving it, while also rounding up to match the ratings on Goodreads and Amazon. Fear of Missing Out is a book I was fairly interested in, mainly because the main character has cancer. As this has been a heavy theme I was hoping more authors would write about, I was really excited to see how the story would turn out. In short, this book was slo I'm going to be brutally honest here and say that I was not the biggest fan of this book. In fact, I think I'm being a little overly nice with the rating I'm giving it, while also rounding up to match the ratings on Goodreads and Amazon. Fear of Missing Out is a book I was fairly interested in, mainly because the main character has cancer. As this has been a heavy theme I was hoping more authors would write about, I was really excited to see how the story would turn out. In short, this book was slow. Very, very slow. It was so slow, that nothing really happened until 160 something pages in, and this book has a page count of 320 pages. That really tells you something, doesn't it? After those initial 160 pages passed, the story finally began to pick up some semblance of speed and began moving. The main character Astrid is someone I'm sure a lot of us can relate to. She is snarky, sarcastic, and a little bit over the top with jokes (and her jokes include her dying, so image what kind of jokes the rest of us could make). Trying to gain a little more control over her life, she cuts and dyes her hair after receiving her diagnosis. It is after this that Astrid meets a cryopreservation doctor and begins to wonder if that's the way she would like to go. Her best friend happens to suggest an idea after they talked over a few things, and that idea included taking a road trip down to Arizona to visit the cryopreservation facility, along with making road stops to visit monuments in a manual they have. Mohit—Astrid's boyfriend—decides to tag along. All in all, this book just wasn't the best for me. The characters felt like they'd been shortened out from more story potential, and the plot just felt like it was rushed after being dragged for so long. For this, I rate this book 2.75 stars (but I'll round to 3 on other sites).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    I should not have read this a week after my grandmother died from cancer. But this is a beautiful book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Cantino

    Maybe even 2.5 stars. This book could've been so much more. And I kinda hated her boyfriend which was a strange feeling...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Ooof. This book was hard. It hurt and it was beautiful. I loved Astrid and how complicated she was and how she wasn't interested in pleasing others. I love that she has this team around her that loves her and supports her, but they're also selfish, so it gets complicated. I loved this story and how it unfolded and I only wish it was a little longer, so certain aspects had a little more time to play out. At it's heart, this is a story about living by our own terms, making our own choices, and doi Ooof. This book was hard. It hurt and it was beautiful. I loved Astrid and how complicated she was and how she wasn't interested in pleasing others. I love that she has this team around her that loves her and supports her, but they're also selfish, so it gets complicated. I loved this story and how it unfolded and I only wish it was a little longer, so certain aspects had a little more time to play out. At it's heart, this is a story about living by our own terms, making our own choices, and doing what's best for us before anyone else, because nobody else knows exactly what you're going through. That's a reminder I think we all need, even if we aren't dying.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Les

    16 year old Astrid knows that she is dying. After spending 9 months battling a brain tumor she gets 2 years of relatively normal life before it came back with a vengeance. In that time she dedicated herself to science and understands what is happening far too well than anyone her age ever should. She has a boyfriend and dreams of a future as a scientist and now they're shattered. She knows only too well that the chemo and other treatments will be even worse this time but they'd only be fighting a 16 year old Astrid knows that she is dying. After spending 9 months battling a brain tumor she gets 2 years of relatively normal life before it came back with a vengeance. In that time she dedicated herself to science and understands what is happening far too well than anyone her age ever should. She has a boyfriend and dreams of a future as a scientist and now they're shattered. She knows only too well that the chemo and other treatments will be even worse this time but they'd only be fighting a losing battle. However, her mother is an eternal optimist and pushes Astrid to get accepted into an experimental treatment program. What she seems totally unable to grasp, despite Astrid and her oncologist both trying to tell her, is that the experimental treatment isn't a cure. It would only buy her some time, she might be in the control group that gets the placebo so she wouldn't benefit from any breakthrough, and that sometimes experimental programs are even harsher on the recipients than established treatment protocols. [As an aside, I will note that the last statement is absolutely true. My mother was in an experimental protocol for colon cancer after other treatments failed, and it was so debilitating that she dropped out of the study and elected hospice instead]. But she agrees to apply just to appease her mother, because she feels guilty about subjecting her to so much by herself. Her father is an absolute total fuckwit. He decided to divorce when Astrid was 12 because his calling was to live off the grid in Arizona, living in a commune and avoiding modern conveniences. Which is fine, if that's what floats your boat, but that doesn't give him the right to insinuate that Astrid got her brain cancer because of television and microwave exposure. Needless to say, there's no love lost between daughter and dad over that asshat comment. So Astrid is still weighing her options when she meets a young scientist who is working in the field of cryopreservation - literally freezing her entire body, or just her brain, in hopes of one day being able to revive and cure her. He invites her to come visit their facility someday and see if it is the right choice for her. Unfortunately, the facility is in Arizona and she lives in the northeast. The process also costs about $30k and they're strapped after paying all of her medical bills. But her BFF talks her into creating a vlog to get people to donate; even if she can't raise enough for the process then maybe at least they'll get enough for her to satisfy her scientific curiosity and visit the facility. Her boyfriend and mother are both opposed to the idea of her travelling cross-country, but her BFF's mom has an RV she's willing to let them use and Astrid convinces her mother that she's entitled to one great adventure since there are so many things she'll likely never get a chance to experience. Her boyfriend reluctantly comes along. He and BFF don't get along so it's a real challenge for them to be in a vehicle together for several days together. As they leave Astrid can already feel her body weakening from the cancer's faster than usual growth. Along the way they stop at a couple of kitschy roadside attractions before hitting Arizona and dropping by to see Daddy Dearest. Things don't go well, in part due to a surprise I won't spoil. Then they finally get to the facility and meet the director and take the nickle tour. It's a combination of fascinating and horrifying, but his enthusiasm over Astrid as a potential future resident there grates on her boyfriend's last nerve on the subject. So the return trip starts with everyone's nerves on edge. He can't believe she's even thinking about it while her interest is more clinical than enthusiastic; she isn't committing just wanting to get all the facts. Don't want to say too much more because it would result in spoilers, but suffice to say that Astrid decides what she wants and defends it to her family and friends. Tough novel that pulls no punches; you know at the start that there will be no miracles for her. Astrid is a likable character, although her constant gallows humor about her impending fate wears on her mother's nerves. And she has an encyclopedic knowledge of what is happening now and will happen in the future as her body begins to fail due to the relentless cancer. And without giving away anything I'd agree that she made the right choice given the circumstances of her particular situation.

  9. 4 out of 5

    reenie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was expecting a The Fault in Our Stars situation, but I actually really enjoyed this book, even if the ending devastated me. Cliffhangers, much? They Both Die at the End and Fear of Missing Out are really similar towards their ending. I expected an astronomy-themed book because of the introduction, but I'm kinda disappointed that it was not explored further. During the last second half of the book, I got serious Me Before You vibes. Fear of Missing Out is the perfect combination of science-fict I was expecting a The Fault in Our Stars situation, but I actually really enjoyed this book, even if the ending devastated me. Cliffhangers, much? They Both Die at the End and Fear of Missing Out are really similar towards their ending. I expected an astronomy-themed book because of the introduction, but I'm kinda disappointed that it was not explored further. During the last second half of the book, I got serious Me Before You vibes. Fear of Missing Out is the perfect combination of science-fiction and realistic-fiction. I really love how Ms. Kate McGovern explored cryogenics, which is something that most people don't know but is a fascinating topic for the future of science. The variety of characters and perspectives is brilliant because it kept the story interesting. It was a quietly devastating novel especially when Mohit and Chloe open up about their future loss of their best friend. Astrid mildly irked me, but I admire her strength and wisdom beyond her years due to her unfortunate circumstances. I like how the novel is a smooth combination between old and new clichés, and it was short and sweet enough that I was able to read it in under 24 hours. I like how Astrid kept it open about her feelings towards death, not focusing only on the fear and uncertainty behind dying so young. I love how it was realistic and wasn't cookie-cutter. I love that Ms. Kate McGovern didn't focus solely on love declarations between Mohit and Astrid after Astrid's terminal diagnosis. Their relationship is dysfunctional. Included in the short novel are snippets between Astrid's relationships with her family and friends following the diagnosis. Happy Monday! Hope your day is going well. And if it isn't, I hope that tomorrow or sometime in the near future, it gets better. Because I promise that it will. Maybe not today or tomorrow, but soon. Do things that make you happy, and above else, amor omnia vincent. with love forever, Reenie 💋

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Sixteen-year-old Astrid Ayeroff knows all the signs that something is wrong again. Having beaten astrocytoma, a form of brain cancer, a couple of years back, she's not sure she has it in her to go back through the treatment and uncertainty. When she learns of a new procedure called cryopreservation, which would freeze her body until a cure could be found, she seizes onto this idea as a lifeline of sorts. If this procedure worked, then maybe she could live a full life later on. With her best frie Sixteen-year-old Astrid Ayeroff knows all the signs that something is wrong again. Having beaten astrocytoma, a form of brain cancer, a couple of years back, she's not sure she has it in her to go back through the treatment and uncertainty. When she learns of a new procedure called cryopreservation, which would freeze her body until a cure could be found, she seizes onto this idea as a lifeline of sorts. If this procedure worked, then maybe she could live a full life later on. With her best friend Chloe and boyfriend Mohit, she heads off on a cross-country trip to Arizona where the cryo facility is. It's clear from the start that Astrid is failing fast, and teen readers will relate to her desperate desire not to miss out on life. But what if the life she wants to savor is passing her by every day even while she's trying to figure out her next steps. It's easy to understand how hard it would be for her mother to want to let her go and make her own choices about how she's going to live or die, and readers may be surprised with her ultimate choice. The sections describing what she'll miss and her vlog posts are particularly poignant and may prompt some readers to reflect on what they'd miss as well as whether they are seizing every moment offered to them right now and making the most of it. This won't be an easy book to read, and I would expect that it will prompt plenty of discussions over her choice as readers ask themselves what they would have done in Astrid's situation. It might not be John Green The Fault in Our Stars sob-worthy, but it comes close.

  11. 5 out of 5

    r.bookish

    Trigger warning- assisted suicide talk This book was so emotional. It was emotional like the fault in our stars. And perfect for fans of five feet apart. I very much could see the resemblance of the two books, which the whole dying, boyfriend, and YouTube channel thing going on. But, on other news, it’s a very quick read, seeing that I read it in hours. I enjoyed this book to say the least. it was a little all over the place, with all the traveling and the home and school life. I wished the roman Trigger warning- assisted suicide talk This book was so emotional. It was emotional like the fault in our stars. And perfect for fans of five feet apart. I very much could see the resemblance of the two books, which the whole dying, boyfriend, and YouTube channel thing going on. But, on other news, it’s a very quick read, seeing that I read it in hours. I enjoyed this book to say the least. it was a little all over the place, with all the traveling and the home and school life. I wished the romance was talked about more. There was two parts where they kissed and actual felt something for each other. It’s very hard to think that these two people are together, and a high school couple and all the couples in real life, are always kissing and what not. Mo annoyed me to death. He was so in love with Astrid, it all he did was complain and say what she was doing was stupid or wrong. He knew that she was dying, but he still wanted to play with his sax. Chloe was by far the best person. She tried to help Astrid in more ways then possible. She created a whole channel and a fundraiser to help her and do what she wants. Half the time, Astrid was annoyed with her mom, which is understandable, but Astrid was also overreacting. She created a whole YouTube channel with out her mother’s Choice. I fully understand why she wanted to spend time with Astrid, since her oldest child is dying of cancer and everything.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Romantic Intentions Quarterly

    Astrid is dying. Her astrocytoma has returned after a period of remission, and this time she knows her time is drawing to an end. This novel is beautifully and thoughtfully written, exploring the different options available to her, and the reactions of her family and friends to the choices she makes over the ones they want her to make. In the author’s note, Kate McGovern writes that she became a mother during the writing of this story, and it shows, with inflections and insight that make the emo Astrid is dying. Her astrocytoma has returned after a period of remission, and this time she knows her time is drawing to an end. This novel is beautifully and thoughtfully written, exploring the different options available to her, and the reactions of her family and friends to the choices she makes over the ones they want her to make. In the author’s note, Kate McGovern writes that she became a mother during the writing of this story, and it shows, with inflections and insight that make the emotions visceral for the reader. McGovern could perhaps have delved a little more deeply into Astrid’s rationale for and against certain options, and the ending bypasses this to a small extent, but that is a small quibble with an otherwise outstanding novel intended for young adults, but that is perfectly accessible to all readers. – Megan Osmond This review appears in Romantic Intentions Quarterly #4.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Mellen

    This was a difficult one but, I think, important. I chose this because it was coming out and on my want to read list, and the library had it. And then my grandma died, which was horrible and left me reading as much as possible to try to distract myself. As I got towards the end of what I had checked out, this one was left, and I decided to give it a go - giving myself permission from the get go to put it down as soon as it was too hard. Astrid's struggle to deal with her illness on her own terms This was a difficult one but, I think, important. I chose this because it was coming out and on my want to read list, and the library had it. And then my grandma died, which was horrible and left me reading as much as possible to try to distract myself. As I got towards the end of what I had checked out, this one was left, and I decided to give it a go - giving myself permission from the get go to put it down as soon as it was too hard. Astrid's struggle to deal with her illness on her own terms, though much younger, was something familiar to what I have just gone through. Her friends and family are struggling, some able to be more supportive than others. Mohit was so mean to her sometimes that I struggled to understand the romance. The vlogging/roadtrip aspect wasn't my favorite, but I stayed interested to see what would happen with the possibility of cryogenics. Overall, I'd recommend this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    **won an ARC copy in a Goodreads giveaway** Fear of Missing Out focuses on Astrid, a 16-year-old girl with an astrocytoma, who's considering cryopreservation as an option for when her body finally succumbs to the cancer. While I found her story compelling, I think what really makes this book a page-turner are the supporting characters in Astrid's life: her best friend Chloe, her boyfriend Mohit, and her mother and younger brother. Their varying reactions to everything Astrid experiences were what **won an ARC copy in a Goodreads giveaway** Fear of Missing Out focuses on Astrid, a 16-year-old girl with an astrocytoma, who's considering cryopreservation as an option for when her body finally succumbs to the cancer. While I found her story compelling, I think what really makes this book a page-turner are the supporting characters in Astrid's life: her best friend Chloe, her boyfriend Mohit, and her mother and younger brother. Their varying reactions to everything Astrid experiences were what made me keep reading to find out how it all ends. My heart broke every time she spoke with her mother! I loved McGovern's Rules for 50/50 Chances, but I might love Fear of Missing Out just a teensy bit more. It's definitely recommendable to fans of The Fault in Our Stars or Five Feet Apart!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I won an ARC of this in a Goodreads giveaway - thank you so much! This book is beautiful and heartbreaking. I've read "kids with cancer" books before but Fear of Missing Out puts a different spin on it with its' look into cryogenics/euthanasia, a field which I didn't know much about. I also loved all the relationships between the characters and how Astrid wasn't the perfect martyred "16-year-old with cancer." Her relationships with her friends and family weren't always perfect which made it so r I won an ARC of this in a Goodreads giveaway - thank you so much! This book is beautiful and heartbreaking. I've read "kids with cancer" books before but Fear of Missing Out puts a different spin on it with its' look into cryogenics/euthanasia, a field which I didn't know much about. I also loved all the relationships between the characters and how Astrid wasn't the perfect martyred "16-year-old with cancer." Her relationships with her friends and family weren't always perfect which made it so real and even more heartrending. (I also loved the few Harry Potter references sprinkled throughout.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carli

    Thank you to Netgalley and Macmillan Children’s Publishing for the advance Kindle copy of this book. It is out TOMORROW! All opinions are my own. • ⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for this one. Astrid has beaten cancer once, but when her tumor comes back, the science-loving sixteen-year-old has had enough of hospitals, needles, and pain. Her mother pushes her to apply for a clinical trial, but after meeting a scientist who works in cryopreservation, Astrid wants to learn more about that route. With rich characters and com Thank you to Netgalley and Macmillan Children’s Publishing for the advance Kindle copy of this book. It is out TOMORROW! All opinions are my own. • ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this one. Astrid has beaten cancer once, but when her tumor comes back, the science-loving sixteen-year-old has had enough of hospitals, needles, and pain. Her mother pushes her to apply for a clinical trial, but after meeting a scientist who works in cryopreservation, Astrid wants to learn more about that route. With rich characters and complex moral questions, this book will certainly engage readers. I flew through it. Recommended for grades 9+.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Mayes

    I walked into this book expecting it to have the quirkiness of John Corey Whaley's Noggin and the pathos of The Fault in Our Stars, and while it was not as brilliant or moving as either one, it was still engaging. Astrid has a distinct, engaging voice as the narrator, and her relationship with her mother is particularly well-drawn, which makes up for the somewhat bland supporting characters (e.g. her boyfriend and best friend). The ending was beautifully written, and I found myself close to tear I walked into this book expecting it to have the quirkiness of John Corey Whaley's Noggin and the pathos of The Fault in Our Stars, and while it was not as brilliant or moving as either one, it was still engaging. Astrid has a distinct, engaging voice as the narrator, and her relationship with her mother is particularly well-drawn, which makes up for the somewhat bland supporting characters (e.g. her boyfriend and best friend). The ending was beautifully written, and I found myself close to tears at the last line: "The view from here is beautiful."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thought out this book I thought I was totally gonna give it a 5 star but in the end I realized that I didn’t feel connected to the characters as I first thought I was. Yes, in the end I did cry a little but I think most people will even if you didn’t like the book. After reading this book, I wish there was more info about the cancer that she had instead of the road trip. I also wish there was more connection with her younger brother and mother instead of her friend and boyfriend. In the end this Thought out this book I thought I was totally gonna give it a 5 star but in the end I realized that I didn’t feel connected to the characters as I first thought I was. Yes, in the end I did cry a little but I think most people will even if you didn’t like the book. After reading this book, I wish there was more info about the cancer that she had instead of the road trip. I also wish there was more connection with her younger brother and mother instead of her friend and boyfriend. In the end this book did disappoint me and that’s why I gave it 3 stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Isidora

    If you love books with strong female friendships, supportive friendships, caring boyfriends and boyfriends who play sax, then this is the book for you! It will make you cry, it will make you wonder, wonder what would you do. "Should I stay or should I go?" kind of choices. This is a book for fans of The Fault in our stars and I am sure that everyone will love it! To read the whole review, go to https://pobesnelabubamara.blogspot.co... :)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tanesha Lon

    Won this ARC & finished the book in one day while I was sick in bed . Once i started reading this book, I could not put it down . After receiving the news her cancer had returned that hit home for me . It was an emotional journey reading this book ,that was well worth the watery eyes while reading . I can definitely see my self reaching in my library and reading this book again. Taking place in Boston was icing on the cake

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Astrid, a teenager, has survived cancer one time, and now her worst fear has come true, the cancer is back. She doesn't want to go through another round of chemo, the sickness, losing her hair, fighting for her life. She just wants to be a normal teenager. She hears about cryopreservation and is intrigued. Is this a way that she could continue on and have a life down the road? She take a road trip with her boyfriend and best friend to learn more. The cryoperservation seems a little far fetched. An Astrid, a teenager, has survived cancer one time, and now her worst fear has come true, the cancer is back. She doesn't want to go through another round of chemo, the sickness, losing her hair, fighting for her life. She just wants to be a normal teenager. She hears about cryopreservation and is intrigued. Is this a way that she could continue on and have a life down the road? She take a road trip with her boyfriend and best friend to learn more. The cryoperservation seems a little far fetched. And it's expensive, her friends start a GoFundMe page to help her pay for it, if that is what she decides to do. She's so young, already having cancer twice. It's just sad for her and her loved ones, particularly because the cancer came back strong. Her mother would like her to give a drug trial a try, but Astrid is just tired of fighting the cancer. It was a sad book. More of my book reviews can be found at https://bookswithkari.blogspot.com/

  22. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Beguiristain

    I’m in awe. Kate’s writing is beautiful, and Astrid’s journey will take you by the heart and drive you across state lines. You might hurt along these relatable and strong characters, but you’ll also laugh and love with every tender and real moment.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Keets

    Very beautifully written. Bring a box of Kleenex!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mrs.Heather Lassley

    4.5 stars This book blew me away. Finished it, and I was completely emotionally drained.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura Johnson

    Such a thrilling story line and very real. I can tell Kate puts a lot of time and effort into her writing!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Very 'Fault in Our Stars'

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    Haven't read a good sad-cancer story in a while, and this one delivered as much humor, romance, and feels as TFIOS or Me & Earl. Plus it's got a best-friend road-trip angle which I loved.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Astrid's "voice" was highly readable -- her voice even reminded me of one of my friends' -- and the first-person POV of a dying teen was new for me. (Yes, I know there are other YA books out there with such POVs, but I never could get into them. Astrid was different somehow. Maybe because her ailment was a brain tumor, and I'm a psychologist?) The manuscript seemed like it might've been really short; I sped through the book in what felt like a few hours. I wasn't urged on by any particular desire Astrid's "voice" was highly readable -- her voice even reminded me of one of my friends' -- and the first-person POV of a dying teen was new for me. (Yes, I know there are other YA books out there with such POVs, but I never could get into them. Astrid was different somehow. Maybe because her ailment was a brain tumor, and I'm a psychologist?) The manuscript seemed like it might've been really short; I sped through the book in what felt like a few hours. I wasn't urged on by any particular desire to find out how things would end -- like I said, Astrid was really readable, with succinct sentences that didn't feel choppy and plenty of understood those reactions and thought they seemed plausible for anyone dealing with terminal illness...their own or of someone they loved. For some reason, I always imagined that terminally paragraph breaks. As the book went on, Astrid sounded far older than her 16 years, especially when she makes her final decision after visiting the cryopreservation facility in Arizona. But I suppose I shouldn't be surprised. I've known so many teens and young people who seemed older and more mature than I ever was at that age. Astrid knows her mind and can speak with authority about taking back her own agency and making decisions for herself. I loved the unique side characters (especially little brother Liam) and how they were characterized. Best friend Chloe faded into the background a lot. Astrid's mom kind of did, too. Mohit and Astrid's quiet, mature relationship had a sort of dignity and meaningfulness that I feel you don't see much in books. I'm glad Astrid had Mohit, for everything she was going through. Astrid's hippie father, who decided to live off the grid at a commune of some sort in Arizona, was also quite interesting. Though I know there are people who live off the grid in the US, I've never had a voyeuristic view into how that lifestyle might look. What meant the most to me in this book was (what I found to be) a realistic portrayal of the thoughts and actions of a dying teenage girl...the way she and her loved ones behaved badly as they came to terms with her astrocytoma returning, after one year cured. I was shocked when Astrid's friends were rude to her when they were annoyed by her -- and shocked when Astrid sometimes made things about her, "playing the cancer card" and thinking selfishly -- but ultimately, I ill patients would always have great attitudes and behave like angels, while their friends and family would crave time with them and cater to the patient's every whim. That wasn't very realistic of me. Having never lost anyone close to me, the book didn't really hit me much emotionally. I think it may be difficult to read for anyone who's lost someone recently, especially if they lost someone who was young. "I’ve never particularly liked the battle metaphor for cancer, at least not since I got cancer myself. It’s like there are two kinds of cancer patients: the fighters and the pushovers. And it’s so obvious to everyone that the pushovers are the losers, and the fighters are the ones deserving of respect. They’re the ones dying the noble deaths—because they do still die, of course; it’s not like you can actually outsmart cancer just by wishing you could. But the pushovers, the ones who say, 'This is it for me, and I accept that,' they take the blame for their own mortality. As if, if we’d only hoped a little harder, begged the universe a little louder, we could’ve turned the tide of our own eventuality, but we didn’t, and so we don’t. Death is our own fault."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Astrid's story is relevant and timely in a world where people face cancer in many different forms. I really enjoyed this story and the way the author handles the tough choices that need to be made. Full of emotion and a heartbreaking moments. This one left me in tears and thinking about it long after the story ended. Thank you netgalley for an arc in exchange for my honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Antoinette Trentham

    ALL THE STARS!! Your going to need a box of tissues for The Fear of Missing Out Title: Fear of Missing Out Author: Kate McGovern Publication Date: March 19th Synopsis: In The Fear of Missing Out, Astrid, a sixteen year-old girl, has a recurrence of brain cancer. Astrid, along with her boyfriend, Mohit, and best friend, Chloe, travel the U.S. in search of options for Astrid’s life. As Astrid learns options for her death, her family and friends must learn to selflessly allow her to make choices. Opini ALL THE STARS!! Your going to need a box of tissues for The Fear of Missing Out Title: Fear of Missing Out Author: Kate McGovern Publication Date: March 19th Synopsis: In The Fear of Missing Out, Astrid, a sixteen year-old girl, has a recurrence of brain cancer. Astrid, along with her boyfriend, Mohit, and best friend, Chloe, travel the U.S. in search of options for Astrid’s life. As Astrid learns options for her death, her family and friends must learn to selflessly allow her to make choices. Opinion: Be prepared for the globus sensation! In fact, I’m currently writing this with a lump in my throat! I enjoyed this book and the range of emotions that came about. This novel heart wrenchingly encapsulates the realities of friendships and family in the harrowing situation of dealing with a terminal disease. Astrid is an amazing young lady dealing with the cruelness of cancer. There were times when I was so upset with Mohit and Chloe, but I had to remind myself that the characters were teenagers dealing with an incredible difficult situation. I empathized with the mother to an almost unbearable degree. Like, I had to but the book down at times because it was so emotionally difficult to continue. This book would be an ideal choice for a YA book club with powerful discussion forthcoming. Rating 10/10...yes, really THAT GOOD!!

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