kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Cygnet

Availability: Ready to download

An utterly original coming-of-age tale, marked by wrenching humor and staggering charisma, about a young woman resisting the savagery of adulthood in a community of the elderly rejecting the promise of youth. “Cygnet is a beautiful book, a meander through the fluid anxiety of youth, an observation of fixed imperfections of age, and a longing search for compassion on the jou An utterly original coming-of-age tale, marked by wrenching humor and staggering charisma, about a young woman resisting the savagery of adulthood in a community of the elderly rejecting the promise of youth. “Cygnet is a beautiful book, a meander through the fluid anxiety of youth, an observation of fixed imperfections of age, and a longing search for compassion on the journey between.”  —Uzodinma Iweala, author of Speak No Evil and Beasts of No Nation “It’s too hot for most of the clothes I packed to come here, when I thought this would only be for a week or two. My mother kissed me with those purple-brown lips of hers and said, we’ll be back, hold tight.” The seventeen-year-old Kid doesn’t know where her parents are. They left her with her grandmother Lolly, promising to return soon. That was months ago. Now Lolly is dead and the Kid is alone, stranded ten miles off the coast of New Hampshire on tiny Swan Island. Unable to reach her parents and with no other relatives to turn to, she works for a neighbor, airbrushing the past by digitally retouching family photos and movies to earn enough money to survive. Surrounded by the vast ocean, the Kid’s temporary home is no ordinary vacation retreat. The island is populated by an idiosyncratic group of the elderly who call themselves Wrinklies. They have left behind the youth-obsessed mainland—“the Bad Place”—to create their own alternative community, one where only the elderly are welcome. The adolescent’s presence on their island oasis unnerves the Wrinklies, turning some downright hostile. They don’t care if she has nowhere to go;they just want her gone. She is a reminder of all they’ve left behind and are determined to forget. But the Kid isn’t the only problem threatening the insular community. Swan Island is eroding into the rising sea, threatening the Wrinklies’ very existence there. The Kid’s own house edges closer to the seaside cliffs each day. To find a way forward, she must come to terms with the realities of her life, the inevitability of loss, and an unknown future that is hers alone to embrace. Season Butler makes her literary debut with an ambitious work of bold imagination. Tough and tender, compassionate and ferocious, understated and provocative, Cygnet is a meditation on death and life, past and future, aging and youth, memory and forgetting, that explores what it means to find acceptance—of things gone and of those yet to come.


Compare
kode adsense disini

An utterly original coming-of-age tale, marked by wrenching humor and staggering charisma, about a young woman resisting the savagery of adulthood in a community of the elderly rejecting the promise of youth. “Cygnet is a beautiful book, a meander through the fluid anxiety of youth, an observation of fixed imperfections of age, and a longing search for compassion on the jou An utterly original coming-of-age tale, marked by wrenching humor and staggering charisma, about a young woman resisting the savagery of adulthood in a community of the elderly rejecting the promise of youth. “Cygnet is a beautiful book, a meander through the fluid anxiety of youth, an observation of fixed imperfections of age, and a longing search for compassion on the journey between.”  —Uzodinma Iweala, author of Speak No Evil and Beasts of No Nation “It’s too hot for most of the clothes I packed to come here, when I thought this would only be for a week or two. My mother kissed me with those purple-brown lips of hers and said, we’ll be back, hold tight.” The seventeen-year-old Kid doesn’t know where her parents are. They left her with her grandmother Lolly, promising to return soon. That was months ago. Now Lolly is dead and the Kid is alone, stranded ten miles off the coast of New Hampshire on tiny Swan Island. Unable to reach her parents and with no other relatives to turn to, she works for a neighbor, airbrushing the past by digitally retouching family photos and movies to earn enough money to survive. Surrounded by the vast ocean, the Kid’s temporary home is no ordinary vacation retreat. The island is populated by an idiosyncratic group of the elderly who call themselves Wrinklies. They have left behind the youth-obsessed mainland—“the Bad Place”—to create their own alternative community, one where only the elderly are welcome. The adolescent’s presence on their island oasis unnerves the Wrinklies, turning some downright hostile. They don’t care if she has nowhere to go;they just want her gone. She is a reminder of all they’ve left behind and are determined to forget. But the Kid isn’t the only problem threatening the insular community. Swan Island is eroding into the rising sea, threatening the Wrinklies’ very existence there. The Kid’s own house edges closer to the seaside cliffs each day. To find a way forward, she must come to terms with the realities of her life, the inevitability of loss, and an unknown future that is hers alone to embrace. Season Butler makes her literary debut with an ambitious work of bold imagination. Tough and tender, compassionate and ferocious, understated and provocative, Cygnet is a meditation on death and life, past and future, aging and youth, memory and forgetting, that explores what it means to find acceptance—of things gone and of those yet to come.

30 review for Cygnet

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angela M

    3.5 stars rounded up . This is an introspective book, a portrait of loneliness, not just the being alone kind of loneliness, but being among people and not wanted. Seventeen year old Kid, that’s what the elderly people on Swan Island call her. She’s the daughter of drug addict parents who leave her with her grandmother on the island where the “Swans” are living out their old age and they don’t much like having her around. When her grandmother dies, she’s left to fend for herself, waiting for her 3.5 stars rounded up . This is an introspective book, a portrait of loneliness, not just the being alone kind of loneliness, but being among people and not wanted. Seventeen year old Kid, that’s what the elderly people on Swan Island call her. She’s the daughter of drug addict parents who leave her with her grandmother on the island where the “Swans” are living out their old age and they don’t much like having her around. When her grandmother dies, she’s left to fend for herself, waiting for her parents to come back as they promised, while the ocean wears away at the cliffs and she fears that the land around and under her grandmother’s house will fall. Flashbacks to the time before she arrived here reveal that her life was not very stable then either on the mainland, and her childhood not a very happy one, a lonely one then as well. But yet, she continues to believe that she has to stay until her parents return for her. There are some quirky people here, but a few of them are kind to her or at least tolerate her. Several things happen that move her to despair, but allow her to come to terms in a more realistic way about how to move forward with her life. There’s not much of a reprieve from that gut wrenching sadness Kid feels, but there is ultimately and thankfully the moment when she comes of age and to an understanding of what she has to do. A sad, quirky and moving story. I’m bothered when characters go unnamed and I was here as well, but still I was able to feel for The Kid. I received an advanced copy of this book from HarperCollins through NetGalley and Edelweiss.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    Cygnet is a wholly original coming-of-age novel and a great debut which is effectively a meditation on the difficulty faced by teens who are transitioning into adulthood; a feeling we all know personally. Ms Butler explores issues surrounding loneliness, social isolation, bullying, self-confidence, confusion, love, parenting, family relationships, desperation and drug addiction. It's a well-told story which was rather moving as The Kid manoeuvred her way around the dystopian landscape she inhabi Cygnet is a wholly original coming-of-age novel and a great debut which is effectively a meditation on the difficulty faced by teens who are transitioning into adulthood; a feeling we all know personally. Ms Butler explores issues surrounding loneliness, social isolation, bullying, self-confidence, confusion, love, parenting, family relationships, desperation and drug addiction. It's a well-told story which was rather moving as The Kid manoeuvred her way around the dystopian landscape she inhabited. There is a profundity to it all that is often missing in books featuring youngsters so I found that very refreshing. All in all, this is a bleak and disturbing work of fiction with some insightful rumination and wonderful depiction of the Isle of Swan and the characters, especially the elderly known in the novel as wrinklies. I thought the lack of named characters was a superb idea to showcase the issues with which they were suffering and making them the central aspect of the story. What is illustrated adeptly is the differences and similarities between the old and young and that each age group has its own struggles to contend with. Many thanks to Dialogue Books for an ARC.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Radiantflux

    75th book for 2019. While I liked the writing in parts, the overall pacing seemed off to me, with very little happening over the course of the book and a final sudden "coming-of-age" of the main character seemingly tacked on at the end. While I found neither the main character nor her flock of elderly tormentors were particularly likeable or interesting this might just be because I am the wrong demographic for this book. 2-stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    Umm..... what did I just read....? I am a bit confused by what I just read and I want answers. Dubbed a coming-of-age novel we meet a seventeen year-old girl who is called Kid by the persons around her. Kid went to live temporarily with her Grandmother on Swan Island off the coast of New Hampshire. Swan Island is home to the Wrinklies as Kid calls them- they moved to Swan Island to be away from the "Bad Place"- that is, the "real world". The Wrinklies all gather on Swan Island to retire and... Umm..... what did I just read....? I am a bit confused by what I just read and I want answers. Dubbed a coming-of-age novel we meet a seventeen year-old girl who is called Kid by the persons around her. Kid went to live temporarily with her Grandmother on Swan Island off the coast of New Hampshire. Swan Island is home to the Wrinklies as Kid calls them- they moved to Swan Island to be away from the "Bad Place"- that is, the "real world". The Wrinklies all gather on Swan Island to retire and...die, some of the Wrinklies are strong separatist who do not want to see any young persons on the island. Kid is made to feel unwelcome as she awaits the return of her parents. What was supposed to be a temporary arrangement for Kid, turns into her Grandmother dying and Kid being left to fend for herself on an island where she is not welcomed. Added to that is Kid is waiting on her parents to return so she keeps the need to stay out until they get there. I cannot say I enjoyed this read. I felt it dragged in a lot of areas. I was expecting a dystopian read and it was nothing like that. I just felt underwhelmed for majority of the read, it was as if the book was not going anywhere...kinda like Kid I guess. Maybe this is a me thing and not the book but it just was not for me...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    Strange, I always confuse the title with signet, but y makes all the difference, the meaning is a baby swan, someone on the brink of becoming a magnificent creature, so you’re going in expecting a coming of age story and that’s what it is. A story of a 17 year old young woman left on an island of old people by her insufficient parents. This story might have been the case of a setting outshining the protagonist. The island is so strange, its population are agists separatists, who want nothing to Strange, I always confuse the title with signet, but y makes all the difference, the meaning is a baby swan, someone on the brink of becoming a magnificent creature, so you’re going in expecting a coming of age story and that’s what it is. A story of a 17 year old young woman left on an island of old people by her insufficient parents. This story might have been the case of a setting outshining the protagonist. The island is so strange, its population are agists separatists, who want nothing to do with the mainland or anyone above retirement age, which creates for a singular experience. Especially for one as young as the girl. She finds ways to fit in, she works for an old eccentric lady determined to digitally optimize her entire past into a most acceptable version. She tries to make friends with some of the islanders. She sleeps with a dealer who visits island once a month to provide recreational enhancements. She waits for her parents. Meanwhile, the island is succumbing to the sea, making the very place feel temporary and fleeting, ephemeral in a way, much like those who live there. For them it’s a final destination, but for the girl it’s only a layover, she has (literally and metaphorically) reached the precipice and now has to make some decisions. Which is how coming of age stories usually go. The writing is quite good, but it is mainly a first person (and a very young persona t that) stream of consciousness kind of narration and so, while hauntingly lyrical in execution, this novel may not be for everyone. I enjoyed it, it read quickly, but it didn’t really wow. It was more of a thing to appreciate than love. It’s quite well done for a debut and a good read if you’re in a mood for a quiet sad (though not depressing) story. The island of Wrinklies is certainly its most memorable thing though, not the protagonist, despite the title’s suggestion. Thanks Netgalley.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Slocombe

    I don't know why but I thought this was going to be dystopian. It's not, Swan Island is more like a retirement village for anti-social old people. The Kid being abandoned on the island with them is not what anyone wants. . Season Butler's writing is lovely and very descriptive. Occasionally there were a few too many adjectives. It's not a book where things happen, it's more introspective, all about love and loneliness and learning to let people go so you can begin to live your own life. . The sea pl I don't know why but I thought this was going to be dystopian. It's not, Swan Island is more like a retirement village for anti-social old people. The Kid being abandoned on the island with them is not what anyone wants. . Season Butler's writing is lovely and very descriptive. Occasionally there were a few too many adjectives. It's not a book where things happen, it's more introspective, all about love and loneliness and learning to let people go so you can begin to live your own life. . The sea plays an integral part in the novel. An ominous presence which The Kid fears. It is wearing away at the island like time wearing away at life. It's a metaphor that is prominent throughout and it works very well. The loneliness and the wearing down by the waves. The Kid is depressed and abandoned and time is crashing down upon her. . The Kid's history is faintly revealed, there's the beginning of a rape story and then it's just never mentioned again, glossed over and forgotten, her parents are negligent drug addicts but viewed in such a rose tinted way. I feel at 17/18 The Kid is too old to still be idolising her parents without an awareness of the negative impact her upbringing has had on her. She's becoming an adult and yet in some ways she's written like a much younger child, I didn't always believe in her as a person. . Overall I enjoyed the writing and most of the story but at points the characters lacked believability. I'd still recommend giving it a try and if you've read it I'd love to hear what you thought? . Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy for review. Cygnet is out now.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    A beautifully written coming-of-age narrative that just meandered a bit too much for my tastes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marisa

    What an odd book! Don’t get me wrong, it’s good. Season Butler is a hell of a writer. Butler’s diction and syntax throughout the whole novel are compelling and really help to piece together an entire world for the reader to get lost in. And it’s easy to get lost with the Swans and feel out of place while reading about our heroine trying to navigate her time on the island as she’s essentially been abandoned and rejected by just about everyone she knows. Ultimately, I think the novel’s biggest pit What an odd book! Don’t get me wrong, it’s good. Season Butler is a hell of a writer. Butler’s diction and syntax throughout the whole novel are compelling and really help to piece together an entire world for the reader to get lost in. And it’s easy to get lost with the Swans and feel out of place while reading about our heroine trying to navigate her time on the island as she’s essentially been abandoned and rejected by just about everyone she knows. Ultimately, I think the novel’s biggest pit fall comes from slow pacing and aimlessness, two things that make sense in context as well as the atmosphere of the story Butler’s telling. Also, it’s difficult to pinpoint Kid’s arc. There’s a general sense of what she goes through from beginning to end, but I don’t think the end is as conclusive as I’d like it to be. But maybe that’s the point. I don’t know. Overall, Butler is an incredibly talented writer, and Cygnet is a wonderfully original novel. For anyone who’s into the death positivity movement, you’ll certainly enjoy the themes surrounding death that are peppered throughout!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Archer

    Thank you NetGalley and Harper for an Advanced Reader’s Copy of this book. This book was totally unexpected. It was a beautiful meditation on becoming an adult. This book is small but poignant, It covers so many areas in just a small book. It is very dark at times and even has a dystopian feel (though it is not) at times. Really enjoyed this one immensely.

  10. 4 out of 5

    cheryl

    I finished this a while ago, but it lingers in my mind. The paperback version that I read as an ARC (with thanks to the publisher and the author for the copy in exchange for my honest review) came out this week so it semed an apt time to write this. A very basic overview - We meet Kid on the verge of her eighteenth birthday. She had been discarded by her parents (who provided quite limited parenting) and left in the hands of her grandmother who lives and - before our story opens - dies on an isol I finished this a while ago, but it lingers in my mind. The paperback version that I read as an ARC (with thanks to the publisher and the author for the copy in exchange for my honest review) came out this week so it semed an apt time to write this. A very basic overview - We meet Kid on the verge of her eighteenth birthday. She had been discarded by her parents (who provided quite limited parenting) and left in the hands of her grandmother who lives and - before our story opens - dies on an isolated island that serves as a retirement community. Many of the residents oppose Kid's very presence (a blatant violation of the age minimums and standards for joining) even though most recognize she has nowhere to go. After all, using the self assigned moniker the Wrinkles, they came to the island (Swan) specifically to escape "the Bad Place" of modern life. But is there escape to be had or is it a tad futile - esp for the sole cygnet (a baby swan for those who have not yet looked it up) with more years ahead than behind - as climate change chips away at the ground below their feet and takes feet of Kid's yard in moments? And that's all setting...notable and unique, but there's more. There's the boy with whom Kid dreams of escape (and while it doesn't bother me, readers who do mind should know there's sex). There's the adolescent rebellion pushing through in Kid's actions and her internal monologue (it is 1st person...always a special feat when done well), placing rough and tumble wit and rage amid the often lyrical prose. There's the story of a woman who hires Kid to digitally alter undesirable memories out of her photos....melancholy doesn't quite fit that story but it is stuck in my mind. And there are also a few kind friends who keep a loose eye on Kid, including a particularly poignant relationship between Kid and a woman who has dementia - a relationship that deepens whom even as her partner fades further away and the woman's past becomes present with Kid assigned a role. I felt this book. And that's high praise. Did I like all of Kid's actions? No...but few adolescents would merit that praise (and they'd either be dubbed unrealistic or be as boring as I was and thus not merit a novel!). Oddly, in my mind this book was shorter than the 240pp listed here, but I thought it lighter in length, not depth. Maybe the poignancy just made it dense...like rich cake. It is by no means an easy read..."dystopian" is bandied about quite often. There is an acute sense of time and pressure building in Kid and Swan idle (maybe that added to the density). Still, I found spirit...particularly in a scene where Kid briefly becomes part of the cool kids club (come on, every place has them)...and hope. In some ways, this novel is quiet, literary, and lovely. But stuff happens. Not all if it good. And not all readers will approve of some elements (I found they all fit the text and never seemed gratuitous, but for those who avoid it there is harsh language and drug use in addition to the aforementioned sex). But this book is propelled by characters and setting - which blend deeply and irretrievably into each other - rather than action, even despite the constantly altering landscape. The book stands much like the island, filled with beauty but with waves threatening the very ground below. Which may not matter for some who not see Swan's end, but pushes our cygnet to consider her place. 4 of 5 stars (4.5 but rounded down bc one storyline involving Kid's battle with one particular Wrinkly just didn't fit for me, even accounting for the age of both combatants).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    ‘The Bad Place is where we all come from.’ An unnamed 17-year old girl (the Kid) is living on Swan Island, off the coast of New Hampshire. As the book progresses, we learn more about how she came to be there, having been taken into care by her Grandmother Lolly after she had been removed by social services from her parents’ house. Now Lolly is dead, and each day the Kid hopes and expects her parents to come and collect her. The island itself is the home of the ‘Wrinklies’, with the average age of ‘The Bad Place is where we all come from.’ An unnamed 17-year old girl (the Kid) is living on Swan Island, off the coast of New Hampshire. As the book progresses, we learn more about how she came to be there, having been taken into care by her Grandmother Lolly after she had been removed by social services from her parents’ house. Now Lolly is dead, and each day the Kid hopes and expects her parents to come and collect her. The island itself is the home of the ‘Wrinklies’, with the average age of the population being 78; this is a place where only the old are allowed, a place to escape from the Bad Place of the outside world and see your days out. But there is a darker side to the island; resentment and fear of the outsider is rampant, there is an underground drug-dealing scene, and all is not as it seems. And the island itself is being eroded by the sea, Nature taking big chunks out of the land around the house where the Kid has been living, until by the end of the book it teeters precariously, about to fall into the sea. Season Butler is a really good writer, and some of her descriptions of seascapes and the island are brilliantly done. There is also a keen sense of the life of a damaged girl, on the brink of adulthood, and having to deal with traumatic memories and the perils of modern-day life. The Kid is seriously messed up: self-harming, popping pills, previous abortions as a teenager in a whirl of casual sex. Abandoned, isolated, she plots to escape from the island somehow. Underpinning the general story, there are lots of themes and ideas tossed into the pot, and for me it was just a little too much. There is a general nature versus humans’ scenario, the coastal erosion mirroring the twilight of the islanders in their old age. The neighbouring island has to be evacuated because of illicit dumping leading to gas explosions, and there is a sort of attempt to bring in a wider immigrant theme, as a boat carrying islanders from Duck is not allowed to land, and has to try elsewhere. The island spokesperson announces: ‘We’re not unsympathetic, this much I’m sure you understand. But you simply must respect the basic rules of our community.’ And there is another story thread whereby the Kid is employed by a Mrs Tyburn to digitise her family archive; but it is not simply that, for Mrs Tyburn is reinventing the past, and the Kid is ordered to digitally alter names, faces, body shapes, to create a ‘perfect’ memory to replace the reality. So, all in all, whilst I enjoyed the book and admired the author’s lyrical style, I felt that there were a large number of ideas being mixed together that didn’t always fully work. The characterisation of the Kid as a vulnerable, angry teenager was quite well done, but I never really felt total engagement with her and the ending left me a little ‘meh’, to be honest, just a little underwhelmed. A promising author, for sure, and others will engage more with the story and the central character, but it’s only an OK read for me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Margo Littell

    Kid is only seventeen, but she feels older than her years--for good reason. Months ago, her parents left her with her grandmother, Lolly, and though Kid keeps hoping they’ll return, they haven’t. When Lolly dies, Kid is all but alone, not just an orphan but the only young person on Swan Island. Swan Island, off the New Hampshire coast, is a kind of utopia for elderly men and women who have opted out of life in the Bad Place--aka the rest of the world--and have formed a separatist society where t Kid is only seventeen, but she feels older than her years--for good reason. Months ago, her parents left her with her grandmother, Lolly, and though Kid keeps hoping they’ll return, they haven’t. When Lolly dies, Kid is all but alone, not just an orphan but the only young person on Swan Island. Swan Island, off the New Hampshire coast, is a kind of utopia for elderly men and women who have opted out of life in the Bad Place--aka the rest of the world--and have formed a separatist society where they can relish their age and wisdom and make their own rules. Young people like Kid are forbidden, and though the Swans were amenable enough to her temporary visit, the prospect of a permanent stay has alarmed and angered them. Kid must decide how long she’s willing to hope for her parents’ return--and where she truly belongs. Meanwhile, parts of the island are sliding and crumbling into the ocean, threatening the stability of Swan Island itself. This wholly original novel questions the reverence with which youth is usually regarded and offers a new idea of happiness, acceptance, and dignity. For example, when a Swan nears the end of his or her life, there is rational discourse about how the life should end. Kid, attached to the dying Dutchess, is unable to understand what she perceives as detachment, even cruelty--an unwelcome perspective among those who have made a unique peace with the concept of death and departure. For Kid, Swan Island is an unpleasant reminder of the life she’s missing out on. But the world Butler has created has contentment and empowerment at its core. ***Review originally written for the City Book Review. I received a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.***

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Beth

    I received an uncorrected proof copy of this novel from HarperCollins. This coming of age story follows seventeen-year-old Kid who has been left by her parents with her grandmother on a remote island off the coast of New Hampshire called Swan Island. The island is inhabited by a group of anti-social elderly residents who refer to the mainland as 'the Bad Place' and only tolerate Kid's presence, and tolerate it even less after her grandmother dies, leaving Kid alone. Kid desperately hopes that he I received an uncorrected proof copy of this novel from HarperCollins. This coming of age story follows seventeen-year-old Kid who has been left by her parents with her grandmother on a remote island off the coast of New Hampshire called Swan Island. The island is inhabited by a group of anti-social elderly residents who refer to the mainland as 'the Bad Place' and only tolerate Kid's presence, and tolerate it even less after her grandmother dies, leaving Kid alone. Kid desperately hopes that her parents will return for her. Meanwhile, the coastline of the island continues to crumble into the sea, slowly eating away at the land on which her grandmother's home sits. Much of this novel is about loneliness and isolation. It also explores the themes of abandonment, memory, society, climate change, and loss. The kid is entirely alone in the world and as the novel progresses she slowly confronts the reality of her parents' abandonment and becomes more prepared to venture out into the world on her own. This was an odd tale. Much of the description of the community of Swans led me to believe this would be a dystopian novel but it's really more of a group of grumpy older people who have turned their back on society. Much of the plot seems disjointed and meandering with odd details such as the main character's abortion in the past, tossed in seemingly without meaning or significance. I did not identify with the characters or understand many of the Kid's choices or actions. Additionally, although mostly well written, some of the metaphors were bizarre, such as "My brain's a piece of fat someone picked off their bacon and tossed back into the greasy pan" (205).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    This book was a gentle little allegory about the current state of our lives as we all hurtle towards a climate apocalypse. About the kid, a teen who is left by her addicted parents to live with her grandmother temporarily on a self-isolating island of seniors, our protagonist finds herself in a world where she is unwelcome and unwanted, following the death of her grandmother. With little of meaning to do, and no close friends, the kid spends her days trying to mange overwhelming anxiety while al This book was a gentle little allegory about the current state of our lives as we all hurtle towards a climate apocalypse. About the kid, a teen who is left by her addicted parents to live with her grandmother temporarily on a self-isolating island of seniors, our protagonist finds herself in a world where she is unwelcome and unwanted, following the death of her grandmother. With little of meaning to do, and no close friends, the kid spends her days trying to mange overwhelming anxiety while also slowly unpacking the experiences that led her to this little hideaway. The wrinklies, as the kid calls them, just want to live and die in their own way, blithely ignoring the climate crisis that they’ve created as their island, cut off from “the bad place” rapidly crumbles into the sea. The kid herself is trying to get through days of despair and to envision a life in a world that is falling into shortages and conflict, and that is so uncertain. If this book isn’t a metaphor for what my generation, and the generations to follow who are trying to find a way in uncertain times, financially, socially, governmentally, and environmentally, I don’t know what is. I feel the same quiet uncertainty and building resentment and directionless despair trying to imagine how I can give my kids a safe future, and also trying to grapple with what has happened to get us to where we are, and who made those decisions for us, and who still yields so much power shape our futures. This book took me into my own heart, and I enjoyed it very much. Thank you @harpercollinsus @harperbooks for this review copy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Edwin Howard

    CYGNET, Season Butler, is an intimate look at life and death and everything in between. Narrated by a young woman everyone calls the Kid, the book takes place on a small island inhabited solely by a group of seniors self-titled the Wrinklies. They have all decided to escape the lives they had and start a new ones with the time they have left on earth. Our narrator has been abandoned on the island, called the Swan, right at the moment she is maturing from mature girl to young lady; where she must CYGNET, Season Butler, is an intimate look at life and death and everything in between. Narrated by a young woman everyone calls the Kid, the book takes place on a small island inhabited solely by a group of seniors self-titled the Wrinklies. They have all decided to escape the lives they had and start a new ones with the time they have left on earth. Our narrator has been abandoned on the island, called the Swan, right at the moment she is maturing from mature girl to young lady; where she must embrace adulthood whether she wants to or not. Butler does an excellent job of voicing a confused and uneasy young woman struggling to find her place in the world. The Kid has dry wit, astute observations and unique insights that she doesn't always know what to do with. Very gritty and unabashedly reflective at all times, there are moments Butler's narrator reminds us of how people can be so harsh when conducting self-analysis. There a seemingly haphazard style in the book of presenting current action, past events, and the narrator inner thoughts and feelings. Perhaps Butler was trying to emulate how a young woman's world constantly jumps around materially and emotionally, but it came of as a little too disjointed and hard to keep up with. Moving and touching, CYGNET is an emotional rollercoaster with some razor-sharp wit and poignant observations. A pleasure to read. Thank you to Harper Collins, Season Butler, and Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    HarperCollins Publishers and NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of Cygnet. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. Seventeen year old Kid was left with her Grandma Lolly by her parents, who promised to return when they got their lives under control. Months later, her parents are no where to be found and her grandmother has passed away. Stranded on Swan Island at her grandmother's house, Kid does whatever it takes to make ends meet and keep a roof o HarperCollins Publishers and NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of Cygnet. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. Seventeen year old Kid was left with her Grandma Lolly by her parents, who promised to return when they got their lives under control. Months later, her parents are no where to be found and her grandmother has passed away. Stranded on Swan Island at her grandmother's house, Kid does whatever it takes to make ends meet and keep a roof over her head. The problem is that her grandmother's community was set up to be elderly only, designed to allow the older set to escape the trappings and violence of the mainland. The Wrinklies call the rest of the world the Bad Place, but will their crumbling island make their return to their previous lives an inevitability? What will happen to Kid if she has to leave the security that Swan Island provides? Cygnet represents a missed opportunity by the author to really explore the dynamics between the youngest member of the society and the rest of the island's residents. The novel was just there, with certain plot points that were totally unrealistic in nature. I never really felt fully invested in the characters, the setting, or the plot, finishing the novel mainly due to its length than anything else. For these reasons, I would be hesitant to recommend Cygnet to other readers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    A seventeen year old girl has been abandoned by her parents. They’ve left her on an island in the Atlantic with her grandmother. It was supposed to be maybe only a week, but the seasons have changed over and they aren’t coming back. Grandma has died and the bluff that makes up the back yard to her island house is eroding into the ocean. The girl is living alone, on an island composed solely of the elderly, trying to pay rent by editing photos for $5 an hour as she waits to be collected by addict A seventeen year old girl has been abandoned by her parents. They’ve left her on an island in the Atlantic with her grandmother. It was supposed to be maybe only a week, but the seasons have changed over and they aren’t coming back. Grandma has died and the bluff that makes up the back yard to her island house is eroding into the ocean. The girl is living alone, on an island composed solely of the elderly, trying to pay rent by editing photos for $5 an hour as she waits to be collected by addict parents who will surely come every tomorrow. Cygnet is a delight. Butler’s writing is fabulous. Certain passages are so intricately composed as to just cause the reader to marvel a bit. The story is original enough and with interesting reflective themes incorporated, providing for a good read. The plot is slightly loose, but followable. Butler would be a solid choice to watch for upcoming works. Cygnet could be considered a coming of age or YA text, but adults may appreciate it more. It could also be used in a teen book group to generate discussion. Check it out from a library near you! Publication is scheduled for June of 2019. I received an uncorrected proof of this book as a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to the author/publisher for participating.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amber Hatch

    I want to say that this novel is brutal. It howls out the grief of a young woman who has been chronically neglected and abandoned by her parents. Butler looks this sorrow right in the eye and makes sure the reader does too. The first person narratorial voice is utterly authentic - and she drags us through with mastery. The reader is compelled to stick with the story, not because of any faced-paced action - in fact, not a whole lot happens in plot terms, but more because we know what's going to h I want to say that this novel is brutal. It howls out the grief of a young woman who has been chronically neglected and abandoned by her parents. Butler looks this sorrow right in the eye and makes sure the reader does too. The first person narratorial voice is utterly authentic - and she drags us through with mastery. The reader is compelled to stick with the story, not because of any faced-paced action - in fact, not a whole lot happens in plot terms, but more because we know what's going to happen and we can't quite bear to look away. There's not much let up - mostly we are locked into the Kid's worldview, yet there are occasional glimmers of different perspectives - the unlikely ramblings of a dementia sufferer - "But what do you want?"... "then you'll never get anything, silly." But how can The kid know what she wants or who she is, while she's trying to plug up this gushing hole? The suffering in the this book is powerful, but I don't think it's altogether bleak. By the end of the novel we've hit rock bottom - literally. But her tough determination leaves the reader with a grim hope for the future. Really strong writing from a debut author.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cortney (cortingbooks)

    3.5 Stars “I like to pretend I’m that character from A Little Princess, working away with a beacon of optimism keeping me going: the storybook knowledge that my daddy will return from whatever war that was, shake off his amnesia, and come for me.” Cygnet is gloriously weird, surprisingly funny, quirky coming of age story. It’s about a troubled young woman’s struggles after being abandoned by her parents. They left her on an island full of old people who spend their days getting high and living the 3.5 Stars “I like to pretend I’m that character from A Little Princess, working away with a beacon of optimism keeping me going: the storybook knowledge that my daddy will return from whatever war that was, shake off his amnesia, and come for me.” Cygnet is gloriously weird, surprisingly funny, quirky coming of age story. It’s about a troubled young woman’s struggles after being abandoned by her parents. They left her on an island full of old people who spend their days getting high and living their best life just waiting to die. I felt like I was reading someone’s personal journal. All those little things you do when no one else is around and all those little things you think but don’t say out loud. It’s one of those books where you feel like you shouldn’t be laughing but you can’t help yourself. Some passages in this book really sneak up on you. You’re just reading along laughing at all her crazy musings and then she punches you in the face with something serious and you’re caught off guard and not quite sure how to feel about it because you were just laughing out loud a minute ago. It’s a perfect example of that saying “I laughed to keep from crying.”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amena

    "Staring out towards the ocean makes my heart beat hard, more like it's being punched by someone I can't see, someone who really hates me. But it's also hard to pull myself back from the edge, like I'm trying to figure this out, trying to get my head around how to retrieve the trees and the land and my clothes. How to make this process change it's mind. It's upsetting, and stupid. Confusing in a different way from anything else. Confusing down into my bones." Oh this book. It was so good till we "Staring out towards the ocean makes my heart beat hard, more like it's being punched by someone I can't see, someone who really hates me. But it's also hard to pull myself back from the edge, like I'm trying to figure this out, trying to get my head around how to retrieve the trees and the land and my clothes. How to make this process change it's mind. It's upsetting, and stupid. Confusing in a different way from anything else. Confusing down into my bones." Oh this book. It was so good till we got near the ending. SO GOOD that I thought I was looking at a 5🌟 read at some points. The way this 17 year old battles isolation after being left on an island by her parents, not knowing when, or if, they are going to return. Issues of drug abuse and neglect rise to the surface. It is very original and the voice is clear. I can see why it's been reported to be similar to Holden in The Catcher. The ending was rushed and just not very believable which is so disappointing because I was convinced most of the time I was living this 17 year old's life. So frustrating. Still, I'm giving it a solid 4🌟and leaving you with yet another recommendation.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    Cygnet is a novel about loneliness and isolation, and about hope and moving past hope to something else. A seventeen-year-old girl lives on Swan, an island home to an old age separatist community. She is the outsider, there because her parents disappeared months ago and never came back for her. The old people on the island are hostile, with her as a reminder of the world they want to be away from, and she battles her own loneliness as she waits for her parents to appear. This is a novel written i Cygnet is a novel about loneliness and isolation, and about hope and moving past hope to something else. A seventeen-year-old girl lives on Swan, an island home to an old age separatist community. She is the outsider, there because her parents disappeared months ago and never came back for her. The old people on the island are hostile, with her as a reminder of the world they want to be away from, and she battles her own loneliness as she waits for her parents to appear. This is a novel written in a distinctive style with a memorable narrator, a kind of coming of age novel that highlights differences and similarities between old and young. The narrator's desperation really comes through, and her sense of being an almost-adult who has formed routines in a place not made for her. It feels both timeless and preoccupied with a modern sense of the end of the world. The combination of wildness and sea, depression and loneliness, and quirky side characters makes this a novel that will appeal greatly to some people, though personally I didn't quite click with it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Catherine at The Gilmore Guide to Books

    The narrator of Season Butler’s debut novel, Cygnet, is known as the Kid. She’s 17 and her parents have dropped her off at her grandmother’s house on an island off the coast of New Hampshire to live while they try and get their lives together. It’s supposed to be for a few weeks, a month at most, but three months later, the Kid’s grandmother has died and she’s never heard from her parents. Not an ideal situation in the best of circumstances, but the girl is known as the Kid because Swan Island i The narrator of Season Butler’s debut novel, Cygnet, is known as the Kid. She’s 17 and her parents have dropped her off at her grandmother’s house on an island off the coast of New Hampshire to live while they try and get their lives together. It’s supposed to be for a few weeks, a month at most, but three months later, the Kid’s grandmother has died and she’s never heard from her parents. Not an ideal situation in the best of circumstances, but the girl is known as the Kid because Swan Island is owned, run, and populated by senior citizens; the youngest person there is in their late sixties. The community is a response to the obsession with youth in America so Kid and anyone like her is not welcome. With her grandmother gone the clock is ticking as to how long she can stay before she’s forced back to the mainland. And where are her parents? Cygnet’s premise is a fabulous one and debut author Season Butler uses it to its maximum potential. With her grandmother gone, Kid is now saddled with making a living while fending off questions about when her parents will be back. She takes a job with a wealthy woman obsessed with rewriting her past. Kid spends eight hours a day, five days a week going through family photos, movies, letters, and diaries, and digitally reconstructing them to give Mrs. Tyburn the life she thinks she deserved. It’s fascinating, disturbing, and sad. Gone is her chubby daughter, her unfaithful husband, her flat chest. They’re replaced with a slender girl, a boat named after her and not her husband’s mistress, and a bust that undergoes multiple iterations until landing on a D cup. Unfortunately, Kid also has to take the abuse for society’s treatment of the elderly. Swan Island is an upside-down world and Kid is talked over, ignored, reminded she has no place there, and no real life experience. Everything around her is foreign—the slang, the music, the references—so she is constantly on the outside of the conversation. No one has time for her. She tries to fit in with suggestions to make things better or easier but it backfires. The rest of this review is at The Gilmore Guide to Books: https://gilmoreguidetobooks.com/2019/...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    Set in present times, a teenage girl is sent to live with her grandmother on an island where only old people live. The ' wrinklies ' resent her as they have moved here to get away from young people and ' the bad place' the name they call the rest of the world. Her hippy parents leave her here for a week or two but never return. Her grandmother dies and she is left alone in her house which is situated on the side of the island where erosion is wrecking havoc with the property. Living on her wits Set in present times, a teenage girl is sent to live with her grandmother on an island where only old people live. The ' wrinklies ' resent her as they have moved here to get away from young people and ' the bad place' the name they call the rest of the world. Her hippy parents leave her here for a week or two but never return. Her grandmother dies and she is left alone in her house which is situated on the side of the island where erosion is wrecking havoc with the property. Living on her wits with no money except the small amount she can earn by using her computer skills to photoshop memories of one of the inhabitants, she muses about life, her inner thoughts are revealed and examined. I found it a frustrating book but I suppose it was about how we pick and choose how we want to live. A book about life, death, the eternal quest for youth, drug addiction, sex, friendship, rejection......the book covers so much but the central plot is weak.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    In a world where climate change has wreaked its havoc on much of the world's coastlines, 17 year old Kid finds herself abandoned by her parents on an island community for old people. Her parents said they'd be back, but that was a long time ago, and her elderly hosts are getting sick of her youthful presence. Told partially in stream of consciousness, partially in flashbacks, but all from the point of view of the hilarious and kindhearted Kid, this book is strange and wonderful. It's a little bi In a world where climate change has wreaked its havoc on much of the world's coastlines, 17 year old Kid finds herself abandoned by her parents on an island community for old people. Her parents said they'd be back, but that was a long time ago, and her elderly hosts are getting sick of her youthful presence. Told partially in stream of consciousness, partially in flashbacks, but all from the point of view of the hilarious and kindhearted Kid, this book is strange and wonderful. It's a little bit of a gut punch and a beautifully sad and well-written rumination of the confusion and loneliness of youth, the strangeness of feeling alone when you're surrounded by people, and what it might feel like to live through what may very well be the end of the world.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kat (Why Read)

    This is not the end of the world, but it feels like it. Where is our hope? Why do we sink our thoughts into disparity? Yes at times life sucks, but why don’t we motivate ourselves. Surely no one can steal our joy unless we let them. Why do the young desire to be old and the old covets youth? Are you waiting to die or are you living? So many thoughts swimming in my head as I read Cygnet! This was a short (5 hours in one sitting) but powerful read! I was instantly drawn into this story and strange This is not the end of the world, but it feels like it. Where is our hope? Why do we sink our thoughts into disparity? Yes at times life sucks, but why don’t we motivate ourselves. Surely no one can steal our joy unless we let them. Why do the young desire to be old and the old covets youth? Are you waiting to die or are you living? So many thoughts swimming in my head as I read Cygnet! This was a short (5 hours in one sitting) but powerful read! I was instantly drawn into this story and strangely felt like the protagonist could be me. She was so nondescript she could be anyone. Wow, so many feels and chills.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    https://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2019/0... So this book is about a teen girl living on an island exclusively populated by the very elderly—she was left there with her grandmother for what was supposed to be just a couple weeks, but her parents have not come back in months. And some of the population is hostile, and all feel like she doesn’t belong. This is a beautifully written sort of coming of age story, but it kind of depressed me. There were some weirdly grisly scenes too (ie the butchering of https://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2019/0... So this book is about a teen girl living on an island exclusively populated by the very elderly—she was left there with her grandmother for what was supposed to be just a couple weeks, but her parents have not come back in months. And some of the population is hostile, and all feel like she doesn’t belong. This is a beautifully written sort of coming of age story, but it kind of depressed me. There were some weirdly grisly scenes too (ie the butchering of a chicken). B/B+. __ A review copy was provided by the publisher. This book will be released on June 25th.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This is a novel that I think teen readers will like better than I did. It's advertised as a coming of age novel for a 17 year old girl who is abandoned by her parents to live with her grandmother on Swan Island. They tell her it's only for a short time but Kid is doubtful after several months have passed and Grandmother Lolly has died. I couldn't really identify with Kid or the island community. This book wasn't for me but I'm sure others will enjoy the island setting and Kid's interactions with This is a novel that I think teen readers will like better than I did. It's advertised as a coming of age novel for a 17 year old girl who is abandoned by her parents to live with her grandmother on Swan Island. They tell her it's only for a short time but Kid is doubtful after several months have passed and Grandmother Lolly has died. I couldn't really identify with Kid or the island community. This book wasn't for me but I'm sure others will enjoy the island setting and Kid's interactions with the elderly residents. I received a copy of this ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Cygnet by Season Butler is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early July. Initially quite coarse-worded yet plain-spoken, flawed, and unpoetic, a girl lives with her mom and dad unhappily by the ocean on an island called Swan. She's close to and friends with virtually all of Swan’s elders and a girlfriend to Jason, a drug dealer, whose drugs she uses to relax and seek comfort. However, forces of nature are either physically or metaphorically pulling her home apart.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    An unusual novel about a young woman left to fend more or less for herself on an island of older people who don't want her there. "Kid" narrates and her voice is clear and the language lovely. There are a lot of themes packed into this relatively slim read- youth versus age, bad decisions, global warming (for want of a better word), coming of age. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. For fans of literary fiction.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deaddad

    I had the impression that was a dystopian novel. It is first and foremost a coming-of-age novel and I think I would have appreciated the novel more if I went into it knowing that. It is a first person narrative of 'the kid', a 17 year old woman, left for just a few weeks (but it is now six months) on Swan Island by her parents. This is a 'bizarro separatist society' of old people living together with visitors allowed only one day a month. The Kid is not welcomed by most of the residents. The isl I had the impression that was a dystopian novel. It is first and foremost a coming-of-age novel and I think I would have appreciated the novel more if I went into it knowing that. It is a first person narrative of 'the kid', a 17 year old woman, left for just a few weeks (but it is now six months) on Swan Island by her parents. This is a 'bizarro separatist society' of old people living together with visitors allowed only one day a month. The Kid is not welcomed by most of the residents. The island is also crumbling into the sea. So the impacts of an ageing society and of climate change create the environment for the novel but the focus is on The Kid and her experiences and anxieties.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.