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In 1869, at the age of twenty-five, the precociously brilliant Friedrich Nietzsche was appointed to a professorship of classical philology at the University of Basel. He seemed marked for a successful and conventional academic career. Then the philosophy of Schopenhauer and the music of Wagner transformed his sense of purpose. The genius of such thinkers and makers—like th In 1869, at the age of twenty-five, the precociously brilliant Friedrich Nietzsche was appointed to a professorship of classical philology at the University of Basel. He seemed marked for a successful and conventional academic career. Then the philosophy of Schopenhauer and the music of Wagner transformed his sense of purpose. The genius of such thinkers and makers—like the genius of the ancient Greeks—was the only touchstone for true understanding. How then was education to answer to such genius? Something more than sturdy scholarship was called for. A new way of teaching and questioning, a new philosophy...   What that new way might be was the question Nietzsche broached in five vivid, popular public lectures in Basel in 1872. Composed in emulation (and to some degree as a satire) of a Platonic dialogue, Anti-Education presents a provocative and timely reckoning with what remains one of the great problems of modern societies.


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In 1869, at the age of twenty-five, the precociously brilliant Friedrich Nietzsche was appointed to a professorship of classical philology at the University of Basel. He seemed marked for a successful and conventional academic career. Then the philosophy of Schopenhauer and the music of Wagner transformed his sense of purpose. The genius of such thinkers and makers—like th In 1869, at the age of twenty-five, the precociously brilliant Friedrich Nietzsche was appointed to a professorship of classical philology at the University of Basel. He seemed marked for a successful and conventional academic career. Then the philosophy of Schopenhauer and the music of Wagner transformed his sense of purpose. The genius of such thinkers and makers—like the genius of the ancient Greeks—was the only touchstone for true understanding. How then was education to answer to such genius? Something more than sturdy scholarship was called for. A new way of teaching and questioning, a new philosophy...   What that new way might be was the question Nietzsche broached in five vivid, popular public lectures in Basel in 1872. Composed in emulation (and to some degree as a satire) of a Platonic dialogue, Anti-Education presents a provocative and timely reckoning with what remains one of the great problems of modern societies.

30 review for Anti-Education: On the Future of Our Educational Institutions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    If Nietzsche thought things were bad with education in 19th century Germany, he would have loved 21st century America. This piece was not what I thought it would be and the reading was difficult (and monotonous) at times. Nevertheless, I completed the read and gained some insight. Nietzsche constantly praises culture and classical arts and I could not ignore the constant 'old school' versus 'new school' educational theme that was argued (in Nietzsche's probable fictional characters). I am all ab If Nietzsche thought things were bad with education in 19th century Germany, he would have loved 21st century America. This piece was not what I thought it would be and the reading was difficult (and monotonous) at times. Nevertheless, I completed the read and gained some insight. Nietzsche constantly praises culture and classical arts and I could not ignore the constant 'old school' versus 'new school' educational theme that was argued (in Nietzsche's probable fictional characters). I am all about education of the masses, and therefore disagree with several of Nietzsche's basic arguments and views. Overall, Nietzsche has a very leftist feel to his views on education and what really irritates me about him is his high views on the philosopher and his disdain toward the common man and worker. People have to work in order to subsist in society. People can not just roam the world writing poetry, philosophizing on matters and seeking Hellenistic culture. Areas of the book that stuck in my mind: 1) Nietzsche illustrates a gross indifference towards education quite similar to the indifference that exists in the modern U.S. I found that this view is easily comparable to the modern United States. "We knew this, that, thanks to our little society, no thought of embracing any particular career had ever entered our minds in those days." "Our little society had sown the seeds of this happy indifference in our souls." "We wished to attach no importance to anything, to have strong views about nothing, to aim for nothing; we wanted to take no thought for the morrow..." "Institutions for teaching culture and institutions for teaching how to succeed in life. All our present institutions belong to the second class...." These quotes remind me very much of our modern United States. 2) Nietzsche had an interesting look on education as a tool for the state. In today's era of capitalism, we not only see system higher education aimed toward the State....but more so toward the private sector. "The purpose of education, according to this scheme, would be to rear the most 'current' men possible,-'current' being used here in the sense in which it is applied to the coins of the realm." "According to the morality reigning here, the demands are quite different; what is required above all is 'rapid education' so that a money earning creature may be produced with all speed;" "...of which they may again recognize the State as the highest goal, as the reward of all their strivings after education." "And again, that this freedom may be broadened still more, the one may speak what he likes and the other may hear what he likes; except that, behind them both, at a modest distance, stands the State, with all the intentions of a supervisor, to remind the professors and students from time to time that it is the aim, the goal, the be-all and end-all." 3) Nietzsche had a very nationalistic view on things. He is very passionate about the German language and composition. While I can not share this view toward 19th century Germany, I do share it toward the 21st century United States. The only difference is that the U.S. has little rich history of culture compared to the ugliness of slavery and genocide. I believe American education should be aimed heavily on this subjects in order that our youth should be able to understand the economic, social, and political ramifications of those historical atrocities. "What we should hope for the future is that schools may draw the real school of culture into this struggle, and kindle the flame of enthusiasm in the younger generation, more particularly in public schools, for that which is truly German." 4) A very strong point that Nietzsche makes, which can really be seen in the U.S. today, is the expansion of schools and the number of required teachers. This point is evident in education today just as it was apparently the case in Nietzsche's time and State. This is more than likely true in all areas of skilled occupation. "Such a large number of higher educational establishments are now to be found everywhere that far more teachers will continue to be required for them than the nature of even a highly-gifted people can produce." "....surplus of teachers who have really nothing at all to do with education, and who are called into existence and pursue this path solely because there is a demand for them." "...large body of teachers who have not been endowed with a true gift for culture, and who set up as teachers merely to gain a livelihood from the profession, because there is a demand for them, because a superfluity of schools brings with it a superfluity of teachers?" 5) Nietzsche view on hierarchy and the masses needing a select few leaders and minds to follow was somewhat disturbing to me. The man was obviously disdainful toward the common people and was very arrogant. He also seems to not acknowledge corruption, oppression, and dishonesty in leadership and power. We know these things exist simply by looking at history and at modern political leadership today. "They were born to serve and to obey...." "The Education of the masses cannot, therefore, be our aim; but rather the education of a few picked men for great and lasting works." "For what, after all, do we know about the difficult task of governing man, i.e, to keep law, order, quietness, and peace among millions of boundlessly, envious, malignant, and hence very narrow-minded and perverse human beings; and thus to protect the few things that the State has conquered for itself against covetous neighbors and jealous robbers?" "I now see more clearly than ever the necessity for an institution which will enable us to live and mix freely with the few men of true culture, so that we may have them as our leaders and guiding stars." "...that great leaders are necessary, and that all culture begins with obedience." "...with obedience, with subordination, with discipline, with subjection. And as leaders must have followers so also must followers have a leader-here a certain reciprocal predisposition prevails in the hierarchy of spirits: yea, a kind of pre-established harmony." "...then you too will feel what a pre-established harmony there is between leader and followers, and how in the hierarchy of spirits everything impels us toward the establishment of a like organization." 6) Nietzsche seems to never tire of complaining about the pursuit of culture, but what he failed to understand was that people had to work to live. Life is not free. People must work to survive. Bread is not free now and it was not free it Nietzsche's time. Regardless, here are some of his ramblings against pursuing an education through the institution which he obviously views as conditioning. "If you take this one, your age will receive you with open arms, you will not find it wanting in honors and decorations: you will form units of an enormous rank and file; and there will be as many people like-minded standing behind you as in front of you. And when the leader gives the word it will be re-echoed from rank to rank." "There you are servants, retainers, tools, eclipsed by higher natures; your own peculiar characteristics never have free play; you are tied down, chained down, like slaves; yea, like automata...." Overall, the reading was dry and tedious. Nietzsche makes a few valid points that I have listed, but I find that I hold different and conflicting opinions with him in many areas.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    "... Here lies the whole secret of culture—namely, that an innumerable host of men struggle to achieve it and work hard to that end, ostensibly in their own interests, whereas at bottom it is only in order that it may be possible for the few to attain to it." "That is the principle," said the philosopher,—"and yet you could so far forget yourself as to believe that you are one of the few? This thought has occurred to you—I can see. " Another early work- recently issued in the NYRB classics with "... Here lies the whole secret of culture—namely, that an innumerable host of men struggle to achieve it and work hard to that end, ostensibly in their own interests, whereas at bottom it is only in order that it may be possible for the few to attain to it." "That is the principle," said the philosopher,—"and yet you could so far forget yourself as to believe that you are one of the few? This thought has occurred to you—I can see. " Another early work- recently issued in the NYRB classics with a chic title: Anti-Education: On the Future of Our Educational Institutions (and a new translation, I guess, although this one was very good). To be honest, I did not know of this book's existence until last year. In form, this seemed more like a work of, say, Herman Hesse's than of Nietzsche's later aphoristic style. The whole imaginary encounter- Nietzsche (the narrator) and a friend go to a wooded bank of the Rhine and there encounter an old philosopher and his disciple- just seemed over-elaborate (but not without charm). The discussion of Prussian education did not seem outdated at all, but that may be because of a willingness to read these remarks with an eye to the current situation. Here is an example: "For centuries it has been an understood thing that one alluded to scholars alone when one spoke of cultured men; but experience tells us that it would be difficult to find any necessary relation between the two classes to-day. For at present the exploitation of a man for the purpose of science is accepted everywhere without the slightest scruple. Who still ventures to ask, What may be the value of a science which consumes its minions in this vampire fashion? The division of labour in science is practically struggling towards the same goal which religions in certain parts of the world are consciously striving after,—that is to say, towards the decrease and even the destruction of learning. That, however, which, in the case of certain religions, is a perfectly justifiable aim, both in regard to their origin and their history, can only amount to self-immolation when transferred to the realm of science.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Azzam To'meh

    I so much agree with what is said in this book I found it scary. As I read through, I would be nodding, underlining every few lines, and screaming internally: "Yes! Yes! YES!!". Nietzsche argues that when education is given to everyone, it has to be watered down, and with those having watered down education becoming professors later on, the general level of education goes down. He also argues of the importance of respecting one's heritage, and the centrality of the mother tongue in the creation I so much agree with what is said in this book I found it scary. As I read through, I would be nodding, underlining every few lines, and screaming internally: "Yes! Yes! YES!!". Nietzsche argues that when education is given to everyone, it has to be watered down, and with those having watered down education becoming professors later on, the general level of education goes down. He also argues of the importance of respecting one's heritage, and the centrality of the mother tongue in the creation of the educated individual. A book much needed for many third-world countries today...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    “What - you were afraid a philosopher would prevent you from philosophizing? That sort of thing can indeed happen - hasn’t it ever happened to you?” The core argument that Nietzsche tries to make in these lectures can be embodied by the above quote. Sometimes teachers prevent students from truly learning. Sometimes schools prevent people form being educated. Anti-Education is a collection of five lectures that Nietzsche presented in 1872. The setting consists of a frame story, where Nietzsche and “What - you were afraid a philosopher would prevent you from philosophizing? That sort of thing can indeed happen - hasn’t it ever happened to you?” The core argument that Nietzsche tries to make in these lectures can be embodied by the above quote. Sometimes teachers prevent students from truly learning. Sometimes schools prevent people form being educated. Anti-Education is a collection of five lectures that Nietzsche presented in 1872. The setting consists of a frame story, where Nietzsche and his fraternity brothers travel to Rolandseck, a mountain in the Rhine Valley. Nietzsche and his friend break away from their core group to shoot guns and reflect on their lives. They accidentally interrupt a philosophy professor and his colleague, at which point they both decide to reflect in the clearing quietly - and the story turns to the professor’s conversation. The philosopher in the story identifies two ruinous complimentary tendencies in the education program of the time. According to this character, education is being widely expanded and disseminated while also being narrowed and weakened. According to this argument, the watering down of the educational system is coming from the same ‘Nationalistic’ drive that is promoting the expansion and watering down of the economy, etc. The end goal is to cultivate national “gain” by promoting the conformation of citizens into a national dominance hierarchy/machine. This goes against true education, which Nietzsche sees as individualized, unspecialized, and rooted in the great works of antiquity. Interestingly enough, Nietzsche also rallies against journalism, due to they way it is systemically produced, distributed, etc. The combination of education with journalism and the military-industrial complex creates a heavy-handed centralization of culture and schooling that becomes what Nietzsche calls the ‘Cultural State’. This uneducation incepted by the cultural state is embodied by dominance hierarchies, lack of self-expression, and submission the goal of the rank-leader. True education is rooted in self-discipline and is embodied by the protagonists self-started club - where students would pick a topic and create something around that topic. In this sense, genius is rooted in individual self-expression. After all, we know full well, do we not, that a just posterity will judge the overall cultural condition of a people solely and entirely on the basis of great heroes of the age. ;)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    This book is the text of five public lectures Nietzsche gave at the University of Basel very early in his teaching career. Although definitely not a major Nietzsche work, it offers illuminating insight into Nietzsche's early thinking on the topics of culture and education, similar to what he argues in On the Advantage and Disadvantage of History for Life. These lectures are also particularly noteworthy in that they portray in an original light Nietzsche's own struggle to articulate his early per This book is the text of five public lectures Nietzsche gave at the University of Basel very early in his teaching career. Although definitely not a major Nietzsche work, it offers illuminating insight into Nietzsche's early thinking on the topics of culture and education, similar to what he argues in On the Advantage and Disadvantage of History for Life. These lectures are also particularly noteworthy in that they portray in an original light Nietzsche's own struggle to articulate his early perspectives on culture and education in the midst of trying to be incisive and strident, but also while attempting not to back himself into a corner politically or professionally. The form of presentation of these lectures is also very remarkable - Nietzsche's presentation is in the form of a narration of a past conversation, something like Plato's Republic or Symposium. I also recommend this book for the quality of its prose - here you will find that Nietzsche writes in a beautiful and elegant poetic style perhaps unmatched anywhere else in his early works. This aspect of the work seems to indicate the young Nietzsche had a thorough appreciation of German romanticism.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Nietzsche was an earnest nerd. Hard working, antic, and intelligent, yet so prone to flights of nuttiness that break off from what often seems to be a solid, promising set of premises. The issues he raises, and his models of education, are issues and models that seem to always being debated, and he stopped short of offering an actual solution. Yeah, proposals for reforming education was beyond Nietzsche's abilities.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tarun Gidwani

    Brilliant!! How suprisingly fits contemporary state of education philosophy! Must read for education change enthusiasts.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Although Nietzsche states in the preface that he does not write this book for readers who wish to write a review, I think this helps me clarify my thoughts, to be the inefficient reader he hopes for. So much of his argument I cannot agree with, in particular on the supposedly natural hierarchy between "leaders" of genius, an intellectual elite, and the others, the serving masses, those who attend educational institutions in preparation for a career. I also can't support his belief that culture b Although Nietzsche states in the preface that he does not write this book for readers who wish to write a review, I think this helps me clarify my thoughts, to be the inefficient reader he hopes for. So much of his argument I cannot agree with, in particular on the supposedly natural hierarchy between "leaders" of genius, an intellectual elite, and the others, the serving masses, those who attend educational institutions in preparation for a career. I also can't support his belief that culture begins far above the world of necessity, scarcity, and struggle. Not to mention the other things typical of Nietzsche, like his faith in Greek antiquity as the foundation of "true education" and his vehement, masculine German nationalism. These things aside, if you can put them aside, I can deeply appreciate other thoughts, such as his trust in the contemplative instincts of childhood, the naive intuition towards metaphysical oneness with all things. Expanded on thus: "Especially in tempestuous youth, almost every personal incident shimmers in a double reflection: as an instance of everyday triviality, and at the same time as exemplifying an eternal, mysterious problem that cries out for an answer. At that age, when one sees one's experiences ringed round with metaphysical rainbows ... one's need for a guiding hand is at its most urgent." This belief in the earnest curiosity about life which arises in the mundane inspires me to argue precisely for the free public education that he abhors. Everyone's curiosities deserve trust, enrichment, guidance. I am thinking through what this guiding hand must look like beyond current institutions. Living between survival and curiosity is still difficult today, but the fight to live on must not be taken for granted as an automatic obstruction to creativity or intellectual rigor. So who is the guide? Must the guide transcend my day job (not the institution that I work for, but the work itself)? Why can't what I have, what exhausts me, provide provocation similar to that in my youth? How is there still so much space to think within the mundane? I shouldn't get carried away--even in my job I must not "seek consolation in frantic, incessant busyness--anything behind which [I] can hide from [myself]." Why should I pretend that I'm not bored, tired, kinda done with it all but glad I'm making some money? The ennui is exactly what induces my dreams--and when we are distracted by institutions, we can use them for what we need and want, while knowing full well that they are not where hope is to be found. Like Nietzsche says in the preface, as we enter the battlefield (which one really?), we may consign to destruction and oblivion that which summons us in the first place. He refers to the book, and I see also the larger realm of institutions, the struggles of daily life, whatever stokes us to think. Thinking can be the dream, without the attempts to contain everything in memory. This becomes: how am I already fighting a battle? How do I already refuse to look back? I will drop off this book at the library and forget about it within days. And then I will continue to try enjoying what I can, which includes dumb thoughts that explode into metaphysical rainbows, while I do paperwork, staring at a screen, wondering if the same things will occur tomorrow.

  9. 5 out of 5

    LiberoLibro

    Queste conferenze, scritte dal ventisettenne Nietzsche nel 1872, quando era ancora professore a Basilea, contengono alcune delle affermazioni più radicali e rivoluzionarie contro il sistema della cultura moderna che mai siano state enunciate. Nel suo tentativo di «indovinare l’avvenire» fondandosi, «come un augure, sulle viscere del passato», Nietzsche è riuscito qui a individuare il nesso fra l’educazione scolastica, anche nelle sue zone più apparentemente disinteressate, e l’utilizzazione dell Queste conferenze, scritte dal ventisettenne Nietzsche nel 1872, quando era ancora professore a Basilea, contengono alcune delle affermazioni più radicali e rivoluzionarie contro il sistema della cultura moderna che mai siano state enunciate. Nel suo tentativo di «indovinare l’avvenire» fondandosi, «come un augure, sulle viscere del passato», Nietzsche è riuscito qui a individuare il nesso fra l’educazione scolastica, anche nelle sue zone più apparentemente disinteressate, e l’utilizzazione della forza-lavoro intellettuale da parte della società e ai fini della società stessa, che sono poi quelli di «allevarsi quanto prima è possibile utili impiegati, e assicurarsi della loro incondizionata arrendevolezza». Di fronte a tale brutale intervento, ogni cultura che non voglia identificarsi con l’ordine costituito dovrà agire contro di esso. Dietro la spinta verso una diffusione sempre maggiore della cultura, in cui riconosceva uno dei «dogmi preferiti dall’economia politica di questa nostra epoca», Nietzsche vide dunque un proposito di oppressione e di sfruttamento, insomma l’ombra stessa dell’«economia politica» nel suo senso più generale. Apparirà perciò giustificato leggere questo testo anche come una preveggente analisi dell’industria culturale – e lo storicismo, qui attaccato frontalmente come il maligno incanto che riesce a «paralizzare» ogni impulso a mettere la cultura in immediato contatto con «l’ambiguità dell’esistenza», si rivelerà essere appunto l’agente di un enorme e nefasto processo sociale tuttora in corso.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robert Risher

    Nietzsche had a lot to say about the state of German education in the 19th century that is entirely applicable to the educational system of 21st century America, and I found myself reveling in agreement with many of his descriptions of teaching failures, which I worked hard to combat during my own time as a teacher. In particular, Nietzsche's description of the common educators within the system he knew was a disgustingly accurate interpretation of the same position today. It is disturbing to ob Nietzsche had a lot to say about the state of German education in the 19th century that is entirely applicable to the educational system of 21st century America, and I found myself reveling in agreement with many of his descriptions of teaching failures, which I worked hard to combat during my own time as a teacher. In particular, Nietzsche's description of the common educators within the system he knew was a disgustingly accurate interpretation of the same position today. It is disturbing to observe the stagnation of educational attitudes from that time to this, and many new teachers would do well to consult his views before undertaking their new career. Whether educators find themselves in agreement or not, Nietzsche offers a stout contrast to modern practices, and it is enough to broaden one's views.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kyle van Oosterum

    An interesting look into Nietzsche's views on education. Like most of his interests, he is critical and uses his wit as a philosophical hammer (so to speak) in analysing the primary defect of the educational institution: "Here we have Utility as the goal and purpose of education, or more precisely Gain: the highest possible income … Culture is tolerated only insofar as it serves the cause of earning money." It is shocking that he wrote these thoughts down in the late 1800's where it seems quite An interesting look into Nietzsche's views on education. Like most of his interests, he is critical and uses his wit as a philosophical hammer (so to speak) in analysing the primary defect of the educational institution: "Here we have Utility as the goal and purpose of education, or more precisely Gain: the highest possible income … Culture is tolerated only insofar as it serves the cause of earning money." It is shocking that he wrote these thoughts down in the late 1800's where it seems quite applicable now. It's brief, a little anachronistic, but the gist of the text as summarized by the quote is the running theme and makes it a poignant and timeless statement on educational institutions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Buster

    Although it was pretty short, I very much enjoyed Nietzsche's views on the subject of public education. Despite its age, this collection of lectures from the philosopher still seem to ring true even today. His primary complaint with the educational system of his time was that it does not introduce students to what he considers true culture. Instead, it introduces them to what he calls a pseudo-culture that promises some type of independence and equality for every single student. For people who a Although it was pretty short, I very much enjoyed Nietzsche's views on the subject of public education. Despite its age, this collection of lectures from the philosopher still seem to ring true even today. His primary complaint with the educational system of his time was that it does not introduce students to what he considers true culture. Instead, it introduces them to what he calls a pseudo-culture that promises some type of independence and equality for every single student. For people who are fans of Nietzsche's more famous works, this is a worthwhile read. For those who are not a fan of his works, you may find yourself in partial agreement or complete and total repulsion. Either way, it is well worth the read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sagar

    Though quite incomprehensible in the beginning (to be cruelly honest), the thoughts caught a certain pace after 50% of the *book*. The method of communication is fascinating and the content gets little more concrete as the ideas progress. The linguistics used at some instances made me appreciate the use of language more, making me highlight the phrases (to be used for later, in my own life). The short 90 or so pages book made me wanting for more as what education needs to be was still missing (c Though quite incomprehensible in the beginning (to be cruelly honest), the thoughts caught a certain pace after 50% of the *book*. The method of communication is fascinating and the content gets little more concrete as the ideas progress. The linguistics used at some instances made me appreciate the use of language more, making me highlight the phrases (to be used for later, in my own life). The short 90 or so pages book made me wanting for more as what education needs to be was still missing (could have been intentional) with only a slight hint of the concrete concepts visualized. Was a quick read. Will only recommend to few selected people.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Wise

    Nietzsche's critique of the German public school system.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Once again we have even more Nietzsche nonsense as he attempts to imitate Plato and fails miserably, while impugning public education with a healthy dose of racist German nationalism.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    It's well-written, which is probably the best thing about this book. Nietzsche makes some good points and some unjustified conclusions.

  17. 5 out of 5

    www

    complicated feelings about this. N's phantasmic university is intoxicating to my failed out grad heart. and he draws a very cogent analysis of state interests in the opening of higher education to more people and how this has affected the university, though i dont necessarily agree with it- the idea that uni should be for a select few is hard to parse. but what he really wants, i think, is a university that is useless, that is completely apart from socioeconomics. the idea that education isnt ne complicated feelings about this. N's phantasmic university is intoxicating to my failed out grad heart. and he draws a very cogent analysis of state interests in the opening of higher education to more people and how this has affected the university, though i dont necessarily agree with it- the idea that uni should be for a select few is hard to parse. but what he really wants, i think, is a university that is useless, that is completely apart from socioeconomics. the idea that education isnt necessarily or doesnt have to be a driver of economic development is wild! N wants an exclusive university but exclusive in the sense that the only people who attend are those who truly want to do the work, which N paints as an ascetic and miserly existsncd. n's university is not a professional pathway, nor is academic work itself careerist. that's the fantasy, and he paints a seductive picture of how the instrumentalisation of education as a tool of socioeconomic growth has undermined the power of scholarship, the ends of scholarship, and the nurturing of what he calls genius: "i see nothing but talents immature, overexcited, pre-maturely exhausted, scorched or frozen before they came to fruition". "it was in spite of you they created their immortal work,.. and thanks to you that they died too soon, their work unfinished, bewildered and broken by the struggle" I might be being too kind to it, I think- read on its face these quotes and much of the rest are often pretty chilling. N's thesis statement, that the university is simultaneously too broad and too narrow, parses as that sort of fascist speech about enemies being wretched and pathetic, and simultaneously pervasive and powerful. This isn't to say N's criticism of the university is itself fascist, because I don't think arguing that scholarship has become instrumentalised by the state is, but vis a vis appral to national spirit and railing against "the masses", a term N uses both for students of the realschule et al now attending university, who he also calls unwitting sheep, and those architecting the transformation of the german education system it uses some pretty

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Lira

    Nietzsche's thesis is very interesting (he complains that, as education becomes available to more and more people, it becomes shallower and more focused on practical matters), and he develops his ideas as a mourner of rather idealised era in which universities were concerned mainly with Bildung, rather than with skills. He also takes the occasional bizarre jab at the advent of general linguistics. As a linguist, they gave me a heartily chuckle (and helped me see where he was coming from). But the Nietzsche's thesis is very interesting (he complains that, as education becomes available to more and more people, it becomes shallower and more focused on practical matters), and he develops his ideas as a mourner of rather idealised era in which universities were concerned mainly with Bildung, rather than with skills. He also takes the occasional bizarre jab at the advent of general linguistics. As a linguist, they gave me a heartily chuckle (and helped me see where he was coming from). But the way he delivers his lectures is simply excruciating, and it's no wonder he never wrapped them up with a grand finale. Or any finale, for that matter. As John Gray said in his review of this book there's loads of "Romantic gibberish" you have to plod ahead doggedly until you get to the interesting bits. He does say in the preface he wants patient readers, so... Anyway, in spite of the poor 2-star review, I really want to commend the translators on their good job. It's not their fault, after all. Fred's delivery here just isn't my cup of tea.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tom Matrullo

    Nietzsche wrote five lectures and stopped because he didn't know how to end them. The voice is a younger version of the author of The Birth of Tragedy, but he puts most of the speeches in characters, including an old philosopher. There is a minimal, odd plot that is never resolved. The perception of education is trenchant - a critique of both what we think of as a "liberal arts" curriculum as well as of a practical skill-inculcation mode, good for, as he says, survival in a barbarian world. In br Nietzsche wrote five lectures and stopped because he didn't know how to end them. The voice is a younger version of the author of The Birth of Tragedy, but he puts most of the speeches in characters, including an old philosopher. There is a minimal, odd plot that is never resolved. The perception of education is trenchant - a critique of both what we think of as a "liberal arts" curriculum as well as of a practical skill-inculcation mode, good for, as he says, survival in a barbarian world. In brief, the schools of his day are, in his philosopher's view, a sham and a scam. What he'd make of ours - well, much the same, only more biting. Instead of philosophy, we are philologists, in a historicist world of scholarship, he says. And he's got a big point. It might be fair to say the rest of his work from this point on is an effort to bring education as he envisiions it into view.

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Markwell

    This early Nietzschean text is an engagement with the problem of education; who is it for and what is it that education should 'be' for those who seek it. Nietzsche's 'lectures' presented here take the form of a report of a conversation overheard by Nietzsche and a companion. Stylistically this makes the book difficult to engage with as it is often problematic to discern who is speaking, what the ultimately hold is 'proper' for education, and if they are meant to be an authority on the situation This early Nietzschean text is an engagement with the problem of education; who is it for and what is it that education should 'be' for those who seek it. Nietzsche's 'lectures' presented here take the form of a report of a conversation overheard by Nietzsche and a companion. Stylistically this makes the book difficult to engage with as it is often problematic to discern who is speaking, what the ultimately hold is 'proper' for education, and if they are meant to be an authority on the situation or not. Overall I disagree with the premise put forth by the 'philosopher' in Nietzsche's text; that education should be for the elect and should serve to uphold 'culture' narrowly defined. However I am not certain if this is actually Nietzsche's view, or if he is offering up the 'philosopher' as a negative example.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rob Shurmer

    Reading Nietzsche forces us to realize how much Renaissance and Enlightenment education was closed during the late 19th century. We are in the same boat today and face similar issues regarding 'the system' as Nietzsche did in the 1870s. "There have been centuries when it was self-evident that scholars were 'educated' and that the educated were scholars. We would be had-pressed to equate the two now, given the lessons of our time. The premise now accepted everywhere, and resisted nowhere, it that Reading Nietzsche forces us to realize how much Renaissance and Enlightenment education was closed during the late 19th century. We are in the same boat today and face similar issues regarding 'the system' as Nietzsche did in the 1870s. "There have been centuries when it was self-evident that scholars were 'educated' and that the educated were scholars. We would be had-pressed to equate the two now, given the lessons of our time. The premise now accepted everywhere, and resisted nowhere, it that people should be exploited to serve science and scholarship." Add 'commercialism' to the lot and we could be talking 2016 rather than 1872!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bruno Kulić

    Nietzche was an elitist dick who stood for restricting the availability of education. According to these lectures, he was one of those annoying pricks who thought the past was brilliant and everything new was shit. But I mean he is my past and he is shit so there, I beat his theory. For a moment there at the very end it seemed like he would take the opposite stand of everything that had been presented thus far (by the philosopher in the story) and I thought suffering through a 100 pages of this Nietzche was an elitist dick who stood for restricting the availability of education. According to these lectures, he was one of those annoying pricks who thought the past was brilliant and everything new was shit. But I mean he is my past and he is shit so there, I beat his theory. For a moment there at the very end it seemed like he would take the opposite stand of everything that had been presented thus far (by the philosopher in the story) and I thought suffering through a 100 pages of this might've been worth it, but no, the fictional Nietzsche agrees and so Nietszche finishes as he began, a dickhead.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    I'm not really sure how I feel about this. This book is a collection of lectures that Nietzsche presented in 1872 on the topic of higher education. He never finished this lecture series, and his thesis is a bit vague and muddled. He speaks about the idea of higher education being reserved for the cultivation of genius. He railed against professors and students for taking education too lightly, or pursuing further studies for self gratification, rather than to enrich the world. He never really go I'm not really sure how I feel about this. This book is a collection of lectures that Nietzsche presented in 1872 on the topic of higher education. He never finished this lecture series, and his thesis is a bit vague and muddled. He speaks about the idea of higher education being reserved for the cultivation of genius. He railed against professors and students for taking education too lightly, or pursuing further studies for self gratification, rather than to enrich the world. He never really got to the point of what he was trying to say, and there were definitely portions that were boring to read - he was quite repetitive.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Äsruþr Cyneaþsson

    A very interesting short work from Nietzsche. What is astounding, perhaps even concerning, is that Nietzsche wrote of his concerns that the education system was teaching students to recall knowledge and approved facts, rather than teaching them how to think for themselves. The decline in education towards a production line for industry and commerce was a major concern of Nietzsche's, yet over one hundred years later -- we have perpetuated the decline away from the cultivation of great and libera A very interesting short work from Nietzsche. What is astounding, perhaps even concerning, is that Nietzsche wrote of his concerns that the education system was teaching students to recall knowledge and approved facts, rather than teaching them how to think for themselves. The decline in education towards a production line for industry and commerce was a major concern of Nietzsche's, yet over one hundred years later -- we have perpetuated the decline away from the cultivation of great and liberal minds towards a mere system of indoctrination. It is no wonder that Nietzsche shunned society.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    This is early Nietzsche before he threw over his idols. These lectures, delivered when he was only 28 years old, definitely show some indication of his later thought. Not essential reading; for completists only in my opinion. Reminded me a little of a Platonic dialogue. If you want to read one lecture, make it the fourth one. Basically, students need guidance...blah blah blah...there are natural leaders and followers...genius needs to be allowed to flourish...popular culture is a parasitic degra This is early Nietzsche before he threw over his idols. These lectures, delivered when he was only 28 years old, definitely show some indication of his later thought. Not essential reading; for completists only in my opinion. Reminded me a little of a Platonic dialogue. If you want to read one lecture, make it the fourth one. Basically, students need guidance...blah blah blah...there are natural leaders and followers...genius needs to be allowed to flourish...popular culture is a parasitic degradation.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Houx

    Remarkable. Not what I expected at all, but brilliant. And, anyway, it's Nietzsche on education: what more do you want? The only problem is that it is an unfinished work, so it doesn't finish properly, but just suddenly ends.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Onyango Makagutu

    Loved the book

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sina

    به خلافِ «چنین گفت زرتشت» ، نیست “ کتابی برای همهکس و برای هیچکس“ . " It is book for the few. These few cannot bring themselves to judge a thing on the basis of how much time it saves or wastes." به خلافِ «چنین گفت زرتشت» ، نیست “ کتابی برای همه‌کس و برای هیچ‌کس“ . " It is book for the few. These few cannot bring themselves to judge a thing on the basis of how much time it saves or wastes."

  29. 5 out of 5

    aa

    Filosofía, arte, antigüedad y respeto (aquí obediencia) como ideales civilizatorios entre los individuos más aptos. Nietzsche hoy se horrorizaría de ver al mundo vindicado en la posmodernidad.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert Terry

    Still relevant.

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