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A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1965, a defining year for Bob Dylan, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, James Brown and John Coltrane. 50 years ago, the friendly rivalry between musicians and turned 1965 into the most ground-breaking year in music history ever. It was the year rock and roll evolved into the premier art form of its time an A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1965, a defining year for Bob Dylan, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, James Brown and John Coltrane. 50 years ago, the friendly rivalry between musicians and turned 1965 into the most ground-breaking year in music history ever. It was the year rock and roll evolved into the premier art form of its time and accelerated the drive for personal freedom throughout the Western world. The feedback loop between the artists and their times ignited an unprecedented explosion of creativity. The Beatles made their first artistic statement with Rubber Soul and performed at Shea Stadium, the first rock concert to be held in a major American stadium. Bob Dylan released “Like a Rolling Stone”—the quintessential anthem of the year—and went electric at the Newport Folk Festival. The Rolling Stones' hit song "Satisfaction" catapulted the band to world-wide success. Fashion designer Mary Qaunt raised the hemlines of her skirts to above the knee, introducing the iconic miniskirt. This was not only the year of rock as new genres such as funk and psychedelia were born. Soul music became a prime force of desegregation as Motown crossed out of the R&B charts on to the top of the Billboard Top 100. Country music reached new heights with Nashville and the Bakersfield sound and competition between musicians coincided with seismic cultural shifts wrought by the Civil Rights Movement, psychedelics, and Vietnam. In 1965, Andrew Grant Jackson combines fascinating and often surprising personal stories with a panoramic historical narrative.


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A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1965, a defining year for Bob Dylan, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, James Brown and John Coltrane. 50 years ago, the friendly rivalry between musicians and turned 1965 into the most ground-breaking year in music history ever. It was the year rock and roll evolved into the premier art form of its time an A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1965, a defining year for Bob Dylan, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, James Brown and John Coltrane. 50 years ago, the friendly rivalry between musicians and turned 1965 into the most ground-breaking year in music history ever. It was the year rock and roll evolved into the premier art form of its time and accelerated the drive for personal freedom throughout the Western world. The feedback loop between the artists and their times ignited an unprecedented explosion of creativity. The Beatles made their first artistic statement with Rubber Soul and performed at Shea Stadium, the first rock concert to be held in a major American stadium. Bob Dylan released “Like a Rolling Stone”—the quintessential anthem of the year—and went electric at the Newport Folk Festival. The Rolling Stones' hit song "Satisfaction" catapulted the band to world-wide success. Fashion designer Mary Qaunt raised the hemlines of her skirts to above the knee, introducing the iconic miniskirt. This was not only the year of rock as new genres such as funk and psychedelia were born. Soul music became a prime force of desegregation as Motown crossed out of the R&B charts on to the top of the Billboard Top 100. Country music reached new heights with Nashville and the Bakersfield sound and competition between musicians coincided with seismic cultural shifts wrought by the Civil Rights Movement, psychedelics, and Vietnam. In 1965, Andrew Grant Jackson combines fascinating and often surprising personal stories with a panoramic historical narrative.

30 review for 1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is a good overview of music, with a backdrop of cultural and political history, based mostly in the United States. Of course, in 1965, America was still reeling from the impact of the British Invasion and, by 1965, a host of other groups had followed the Beatles across the Atlantic. Some, it has to be said, were more successful than others – the Kinks suffering a disastrous US tour – while others would have huge hits but soon fade from the charts; think Freddie and the Dreamers or Gerry and This is a good overview of music, with a backdrop of cultural and political history, based mostly in the United States. Of course, in 1965, America was still reeling from the impact of the British Invasion and, by 1965, a host of other groups had followed the Beatles across the Atlantic. Some, it has to be said, were more successful than others – the Kinks suffering a disastrous US tour – while others would have huge hits but soon fade from the charts; think Freddie and the Dreamers or Gerry and the Pacemakers. What is clear is that the success of the Beatles changed popular music in the States, with many suffering from the British domination of the charts deciding to fight back and others being inspired to change things a little. The author uses the seasons to take the reader through a changing year – from the Brill Building to Folk Rock, from Civil Rights to LSD, Vietnam to the Pill and long hair, Andy Warhol, Motown, the Byrds, Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, the Who Timothy Leary and more. At times, the detours into social and cultural events can seem to detract from the music, but gradually you learn that part of what was important about 1965 – what allowed the music to flourish - was the impact of so much social change without too much of a backlash. Yes, there were complaints about the length of boys hair and Bob Dylan was vilified for going electric, but drugs were still not widely on the radar and parents seemed largely unaware that music was changing and the lyrics no longer about young love and holding hands, but moving into more social themes with songs such as “Eve of Destruction,” topping the charts. Of course, the main reason that 1965 is seem as such a memorable year musically, is because of the music made that year. These are records, and songs, that sound fresh enough to have been recorded this year, rather than fifty years ago – “Satisfaction,” “Yesterday,” “Get Off my Cloud,” “Sounds of Silence,” “My Generation,” and “Mr Tambourine Man,” are just a few of the classics recorded in 1965. Amongst the wonderful musicians recording in that year, there was a lot of influencing each other – and revelling in meeting up and exchanging ideas. It is also interesting to see what the protocol was – while Dylan went to the Beatles, the Beatles went to Elvis… Overall, this is an interesting look at music in 1965 and the various influences involved – from Folk-Rock to LSD – during the year. Although a lot of English groups feature, though,, this is very much music seen from the perspective of the US. An enjoyable overview of a momentous musical year.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bob Schnell

    The mission of Andrew Grant Jackson's book "1965" is to tie together the hit music and social/political changes of the time. Although the book is organized by chronological sections (winter, spring, etc)each sub-chapter deals with a genre of music and how it related to American/British culture. Therein lies my first criticism. Yes, most of the music we know of 1965 came from the US and Britain, but outside of our myopic view the rest of the world was undergoing some radical changes as well, also The mission of Andrew Grant Jackson's book "1965" is to tie together the hit music and social/political changes of the time. Although the book is organized by chronological sections (winter, spring, etc)each sub-chapter deals with a genre of music and how it related to American/British culture. Therein lies my first criticism. Yes, most of the music we know of 1965 came from the US and Britain, but outside of our myopic view the rest of the world was undergoing some radical changes as well, also accompanied by regional soundtracks. To really cover the worldwide scene would have taken a much longer book, but it would have better served the stated goal. To be fair, there is a chapter on Jamaica/ska. Having said that, Mr. Jackson does a serviceable job covering a big topic in less than 300 pages, not counting the 35 pages of notes and bibliography. The narrative ranges from "the big picture" to minor gossipy details. Do we really need to re-hash the sexual antics within the Mamas & Papas to understand the sexual revolution? I kept feeling like a PhD of 1960's Western Culture reading a high school text on the subject. Yes, there were some details that were new to me, but much of it I had read, heard and watched before. It s a great introduction but hardly a must own for people whose personal libraries mirror the bibliography. Finally, a word about the chapter "It Came from the Garage". I have to assume from this section that the author is not a fan of the garage rock scene. He seems to believe that the music appeals to "contemporary hipsters" yet the average age of the people I see at the shows nowadays is about 50. Luminaries in the field, such as "Little" Steven van Zandt, Bill Kelly and Richie Unterberger would likely punch Mr. Jackson if he had the temerity to call them hipsters to their faces. Moving on, I have to wonder why there is absolutely no mention of the 13th Floor Elevators or the Monks, both of whom were active in 1965 and both of whom were incredibly influential and ground-breaking in their own ways. No, they did not chart on Billboard that year, but I don't see how any book on the explosive creativity and social influence of music in 1965 can leave them out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Read this for a class on the Cold Wart and popular culture. A fascinating snapshot of American music during one incredible year, it covers not only "music factories" like Motown and the Brill Building but also draws in British influences (the Beatles and the Rolling Stones), new musical tech (electronic vs acoustic), Beat poets (Ginsberg and Kerouac), pop art (Andy Warhol), the anti-war movement, and even French surrealism (it influenced Bob Dylan, who knew?). The end product is a dizzyingly det Read this for a class on the Cold Wart and popular culture. A fascinating snapshot of American music during one incredible year, it covers not only "music factories" like Motown and the Brill Building but also draws in British influences (the Beatles and the Rolling Stones), new musical tech (electronic vs acoustic), Beat poets (Ginsberg and Kerouac), pop art (Andy Warhol), the anti-war movement, and even French surrealism (it influenced Bob Dylan, who knew?). The end product is a dizzyingly detailed picture of music in conversation with culture, art and politics, as well as with itself. It's like looking at a google map of the U.S. with little pushpins everywhere, all of them lighting each other up.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Wilson

    Really interesting overview of what really was a magical year for popular music. Pretty much every chart topper is a classic staple of its respective genre, and Jackson provides insights into how the various artists influenced one another. Like 1939 for cinema, 1965 may be the peak year for American popular music. Also worth the read for learning Cher lost her virginity to Warren Beatty after cutting him off in traffic! The last chapter on Rubber Soul, my favorite album of all time, was a cherry Really interesting overview of what really was a magical year for popular music. Pretty much every chart topper is a classic staple of its respective genre, and Jackson provides insights into how the various artists influenced one another. Like 1939 for cinema, 1965 may be the peak year for American popular music. Also worth the read for learning Cher lost her virginity to Warren Beatty after cutting him off in traffic! The last chapter on Rubber Soul, my favorite album of all time, was a cherry on top.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol Storm

    Absolutely sensational book about one of my favorite years in Rock and Roll, 1965. Even though I was only two years old at the time, this year has always been very special to me. All my favorite songs in the Seventies were from 1965. "Like A Rolling Stone" by Bob Dylan. "Ticket to Ride" by the Beatles. "Satisfaction" and "Get Off My Cloud" by the Rolling Stones. "My Generation" by the Who and "Help Me Rhonda" by the Beach Boys. The amazing thing about this book is that Andrew Grant Jackson fits i Absolutely sensational book about one of my favorite years in Rock and Roll, 1965. Even though I was only two years old at the time, this year has always been very special to me. All my favorite songs in the Seventies were from 1965. "Like A Rolling Stone" by Bob Dylan. "Ticket to Ride" by the Beatles. "Satisfaction" and "Get Off My Cloud" by the Rolling Stones. "My Generation" by the Who and "Help Me Rhonda" by the Beach Boys. The amazing thing about this book is that Andrew Grant Jackson fits in everything that was happening that year. Even if you already know everything there is to know about the Beatles or the Beach Boys, he has amazing details about people like Andy Warhol, and James Brown, and Johnny Cash, and Edie Sedgwick. One minute he's explaining how LSD was invented and the next he's describing how Paul Simon wrote "Sounds of Silence." And the amazing thing is that he really ties everything together so that you understand how it all fits together with the year 1965. The best thing about this book is that even though I thought I knew everything there was to know about classic rock, I discovered some great new classics, like "Night Owl Blues" by the Loving Spoonful. What an amazing treasure house this book is!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    If you are of a certain age or have a strong interest in music history, you'll love this extremely well researched chronology of the stories behind the sounds of 1965: Dylan, The Beatles, The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Motown, Simon and Garfunkel, Johnny Cash, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, The Mamas and the Papas, Sonny and Cher, Frank Sinatra (making a comeback that year), James Brown and many, many, many others. It was an astonishing year in music!! Inside stories of the innovations, inspiration (so If you are of a certain age or have a strong interest in music history, you'll love this extremely well researched chronology of the stories behind the sounds of 1965: Dylan, The Beatles, The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Motown, Simon and Garfunkel, Johnny Cash, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, The Mamas and the Papas, Sonny and Cher, Frank Sinatra (making a comeback that year), James Brown and many, many, many others. It was an astonishing year in music!! Inside stories of the innovations, inspiration (so much sharing and stealing) and appellations are revealed. Andrew Grant Jackson does not neglect to fill in the turbulent history of the time, which informs the spirit of the music. A book to keep and refer back to.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rich Wagner

    This book does a solid job covering the evolution of music through an ever changing period in history.It was really interesting to see how the artists influenced each other and pushed each other to get better and experiment with new directions.The inclusion of the events in America and how they fit in was well done as well.The numerous citations show how much work and research was put into the writing.Recommended. ####I won this book through goodreads in exchange for an unbiased review#####

  8. 4 out of 5

    Helio

    1965 was a great and revolutionary year for music. I thought this book was going to provide an analysis of why that might be so. It gave a history and background of some of the groups and events at the time but didn't have the charm of "Girls Like Us". There were interesting tidbits like: the Grateful Dead used to be called the Warlocks (so did the Velvet Underground); the Kinks didn't do well on their American tour account of an onstage fight between band members; the Rolling Stones Brian Jones 1965 was a great and revolutionary year for music. I thought this book was going to provide an analysis of why that might be so. It gave a history and background of some of the groups and events at the time but didn't have the charm of "Girls Like Us". There were interesting tidbits like: the Grateful Dead used to be called the Warlocks (so did the Velvet Underground); the Kinks didn't do well on their American tour account of an onstage fight between band members; the Rolling Stones Brian Jones beat women and considered the group his; Sam the sham and the Pharoahs song "Wooly Bully" ony reached number two but was the top income earner for the year; Dean Torrence, of Jan and Dean (formerly the Barons) was lead singer on the Beach Boys hit "Barbara Ann"; the Stones vs the Beatles was a markating ploy by the Stones' manager and a quote from page 213: "Jagger's songs tell stories, unlike most of the Beatles' and his stories are also decipherable, unlike Dylan's".

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schwensen

    As someone who in 1965 was only a year from becoming a teenager, I wondered how an author so much younger could bring out the spirit of the era. Facts are facts and any good researcher can list the hit songs and news events, but this book went far deeper than that. Whether you’re a historian, pop culture enthusiast or looking to relive a year that was pivotal for baby boomers in shaping in who we are and what music we listen to, this book will spike your interest and keep you reading until the e As someone who in 1965 was only a year from becoming a teenager, I wondered how an author so much younger could bring out the spirit of the era. Facts are facts and any good researcher can list the hit songs and news events, but this book went far deeper than that. Whether you’re a historian, pop culture enthusiast or looking to relive a year that was pivotal for baby boomers in shaping in who we are and what music we listen to, this book will spike your interest and keep you reading until the end. * Starting at the beginning of 1965 and working methodically through to the end of the year, national and world events are put to a soundtrack that was not only the classic Top 40 hits, but also “deep cuts” and genres that widened the generation gap and defined various segments of society. The British Invasion, The West Coast Sound, Motown, soul, folk, country, easy listening, and the roots of psychedelic and The Summer Of Love were evolving musically and lyrically. Songs had meanings based on writers’ perceptions and opinions, from protest and drugs to teenage angst and puppy love. Combined with catchy tunes and rhythmic beats, these songs are valuable insights into where we were – and where we were headed. * I found the author’s research into the origins of the best-known and most influential songs of 1965 fascinating. Not only did he go behind the scenes during the recording process, but also traced the roots of songs back to the originals that served as inspiration or were simply borrowed and updated to create newer hits. It was a year of massive changes in music and world events and this book maps it out.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    For all the revolutionary music and activities of 1965, I found this book a bit on the dry side. There is a lot of good stuff here, including lengthy discussions of who influenced whom and details on instrumentation and inspiration, but I found that it didn't convey the tumultuous times as well other books on the subject that I've read managed to do. There is a lot of discussion of the Civil Rights movement (understandable in terms of protest songs) and a lot of discussion of LSD and other drug For all the revolutionary music and activities of 1965, I found this book a bit on the dry side. There is a lot of good stuff here, including lengthy discussions of who influenced whom and details on instrumentation and inspiration, but I found that it didn't convey the tumultuous times as well other books on the subject that I've read managed to do. There is a lot of discussion of the Civil Rights movement (understandable in terms of protest songs) and a lot of discussion of LSD and other drug experimentation (also understandable in terms of musical innovation). I'm not sure why there were anecdotes about Woody Allen or a discussion of psychotherapy. It seemed a little here, there, and everywhere, but it was entertaining, with enough anecdotes I'd never heard to keep me interested. My personal favorite was when the Kinks were in Chicago for their disastrous 1965 U.S. tour (the one that got them blacklisted from playing the States for several years) and went back to the house of a local Jaycee for a drink after the show. They got a weird vibe from him and left early. That particular Jaycee was John Wayne Gacy. Since the Kinks are one of my all-time favorite bands, I'm very grateful they escaped his clutches! It's a fun enough read, although there are better books in this vein.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim Blessing

    I don't often read books about music and had to set up a new shelve for it. This is mainly because I have been profoundly deaf for many years and recently got cochlear implants. I only was able to follow pop music when I was a teenager from the last half of the 1960's. However, in reading this book about the songs of 1965, I remembered virtually all of them and will now have to get out the old records or CDs or whatever and listen to them. Great book about an exciting time in rock and roll music I don't often read books about music and had to set up a new shelve for it. This is mainly because I have been profoundly deaf for many years and recently got cochlear implants. I only was able to follow pop music when I was a teenager from the last half of the 1960's. However, in reading this book about the songs of 1965, I remembered virtually all of them and will now have to get out the old records or CDs or whatever and listen to them. Great book about an exciting time in rock and roll music!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Roberto

    Don'tcha just love how distinct each year of the Sixties were? 1965 was the year of jangly folk-rock, and bunch of other stuff like civil rights marches... Andrew Grant Jackson does a sweet job of swinging from social and political happenings, the acid tests, Martin Luther King, the pill, to Dylan going electric, Motown, Coltrane taking LSD and going all free-jazz on our asses, The Beatles just being awesome, and the advent of funk and psychedelia. And what a year it was. I'm all over the Sixtie Don'tcha just love how distinct each year of the Sixties were? 1965 was the year of jangly folk-rock, and bunch of other stuff like civil rights marches... Andrew Grant Jackson does a sweet job of swinging from social and political happenings, the acid tests, Martin Luther King, the pill, to Dylan going electric, Motown, Coltrane taking LSD and going all free-jazz on our asses, The Beatles just being awesome, and the advent of funk and psychedelia. And what a year it was. I'm all over the Sixties, go on test me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jason McKinney

    Jackson does an impressive job of chronicling a year in the life of popular music, but runs into trouble at times because he almost tries to cover too much material. Rock, pop, soul, jazz, funk...it's all here. You'll discover many pop culture tidbits that you weren't previously aware of (you'll never look at/listen to certain Beatles lyrics the same way ever again). In addition to covering popular music, he also does a stellar job of illustrating the impact that said music had on the society ar Jackson does an impressive job of chronicling a year in the life of popular music, but runs into trouble at times because he almost tries to cover too much material. Rock, pop, soul, jazz, funk...it's all here. You'll discover many pop culture tidbits that you weren't previously aware of (you'll never look at/listen to certain Beatles lyrics the same way ever again). In addition to covering popular music, he also does a stellar job of illustrating the impact that said music had on the society around it. The main (and, really, only) quibble that I had with the whole thing is that Jackson seems to delve deeply into certain topics (The Beatles, The Stones, Dylan) and then quickly speeds through a brief litany of other subjects (almost like time lines in paragraph form); these items hardly register at all because it seems that the surface is barely skimmed. Marvin Gaye, in particular, is only mentioned in passing, which is criminal!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ralphz

    A fun overview of 1965, its music and its politics. Jackson does a good job connecting all the disparate dots of the music scene, going roughly from month to month with the Beatles, Stones, Beach Boys and the rest. Don't think this is all about rock, though. Chapters focus on the country music scene, folk, jazz, even ska/reggae. This isn't an in-depth treatment, though. For example, one chapter deals with Dylan plugging in, and angering folkies, at the Newport Folk Festival. A full treatment of t A fun overview of 1965, its music and its politics. Jackson does a good job connecting all the disparate dots of the music scene, going roughly from month to month with the Beatles, Stones, Beach Boys and the rest. Don't think this is all about rock, though. Chapters focus on the country music scene, folk, jazz, even ska/reggae. This isn't an in-depth treatment, though. For example, one chapter deals with Dylan plugging in, and angering folkies, at the Newport Folk Festival. A full treatment of the event can be found in Dylan Goes Electric! by Elijah Wald. All in all, a good starting point. Maybe it'll encourage you to seek out more about each artist - and seek out the music, too! More reviews at my WordPress site, Ralphsbooks.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Macke

    what amounts to a chronological tale of all the unbelievable music created in 1965, this book contains myriad fun facts and serves as a testimony to the power of rock and roll ... it reads as a who's who of artists of what would become the classic rock era, and historically speaking, if you knew nothing about 1960s rock this would would be an excellent place to start ... there are moments that leak into sociology (it was a very interesting time to be alive), but thankfully, the music mostly take what amounts to a chronological tale of all the unbelievable music created in 1965, this book contains myriad fun facts and serves as a testimony to the power of rock and roll ... it reads as a who's who of artists of what would become the classic rock era, and historically speaking, if you knew nothing about 1960s rock this would would be an excellent place to start ... there are moments that leak into sociology (it was a very interesting time to be alive), but thankfully, the music mostly takes center stage

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jim Gold

    I probably particularly enjoyed this book because of the memories it stirred of when I was 13 and 14. There is a focus on music, but the story also explores the many significant historical events and cultural changes beyond music. Medicare, the assasination of Malcolm X, Selma, LSD, Watts riots, Viet Nam, Andy Warhol, the Pill, and an interesting discussion of the creation and first showing of Charlie Brown's Christmas. As far as music goes, this was the year of Satisfaction, Sounds of Silence, L I probably particularly enjoyed this book because of the memories it stirred of when I was 13 and 14. There is a focus on music, but the story also explores the many significant historical events and cultural changes beyond music. Medicare, the assasination of Malcolm X, Selma, LSD, Watts riots, Viet Nam, Andy Warhol, the Pill, and an interesting discussion of the creation and first showing of Charlie Brown's Christmas. As far as music goes, this was the year of Satisfaction, Sounds of Silence, Like a Rolling Stone, and Yesterday. Good book to either learn about or relive that year.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    First, thank you to Goodreads choosing me to receive this book in their giveaway. I was really excited and so glad that I had a chance to read it. Second, the author is clearly a Beatles' fan, so how could it go wrong. Finally, it took me longer to read than it should have because every time I read a song title (which is constant) the song burst forth in my head and I had to sing it (in my head). Well researched, interesting stories and theories, great music and photos! Anyone who likes this tim First, thank you to Goodreads choosing me to receive this book in their giveaway. I was really excited and so glad that I had a chance to read it. Second, the author is clearly a Beatles' fan, so how could it go wrong. Finally, it took me longer to read than it should have because every time I read a song title (which is constant) the song burst forth in my head and I had to sing it (in my head). Well researched, interesting stories and theories, great music and photos! Anyone who likes this time and genre of music will enjoy this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    victor harris

    Although it has some decent annotations of the songs and commentary on the year under discussion, it seems like he tried to cram too much information into the narrative and it loses its coherence. Too often you feel like you are reading just a list of songs and who recorded them or covered them. Disappointing as there was good material to work with considering the output in 1965, but it was mishandled in this effort.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Ward

    1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music by Andrew Grant Jackson (Thomas Dunne Books 2015) (781.6409). It was fifty years ago today (2015)! The music of 1965 is officially fifty years old this year! Author Andrew Grant Jackson takes an interesting approach to this volume. He provides a historic timeline of 1965 with the important rock music of the day serving as the background. This is full of good 1960's trivia, and I recommend it highly. My rating: 7/10, finished 5/10/15.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hunter McCleary

    A fun read although the author did not make a convincing case that 1965 was THE year. Particularly enjoyed the discussion about how one song influenced another. For example, The Supremes "My World Is Empty without You" became "Paint it Black" the following year. So the creative process requires seeding from colleagues.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I am very interested in this subject matter, and I really wanted to like this book. It's entertaining, but I don't find it very well written. I imagine that won't stop people interested in this topic from enjoying the book, and that's just fine. Just don't expect too much from it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    A year of groundbreaking music from the Beatles, Dylan, Rolling Stones, the Beach Boys, the Byrds, Lovin' Spoonful and more - expertly placed in the context of major societal changes. I expected this to read like previously-trod territory, but it was remarkably fresh and informative.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I was 15 in 1965. It was fun remembering a lot of those songs.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sally Anne

    I learned some things I didn't know, so that's no small thing. The end was not as compelling as the beginning. But a recommended read, to be sure.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sevelyn

    This is a complex book. it is a social history book, a music history book, and a book of music criticism. It is also filled with fascinating trivia: coincidences, serendipitous meetings, accidents, and not a few mishaps. It makes you want to re-listen to songs like “96 Tears,” even if you’ve lived your life quite fine for 50 years leaving it far behind. I dinged the book a star because of the almost universal tendency on the part of authors of time-specific music histories to jam in stray factoi This is a complex book. it is a social history book, a music history book, and a book of music criticism. It is also filled with fascinating trivia: coincidences, serendipitous meetings, accidents, and not a few mishaps. It makes you want to re-listen to songs like “96 Tears,” even if you’ve lived your life quite fine for 50 years leaving it far behind. I dinged the book a star because of the almost universal tendency on the part of authors of time-specific music histories to jam in stray factoids, cluttering up paragraphs. This book has its share of them but for the most part, it is a coherent and well organized presentation of what was certainly an amazing year. And after all, who doesn’t love Paul Revere and the Raiders? “ ... the West Coast nights shimmered with limitless possibility,” the author writes. In a sense, they still do, at least in our imaginations and in our memories and in the hopes of legions of musicians who still gravitate to California. This book tells you why.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    In this book, Jackson connects various musical entities with social movements and makes many unexpected connections. I was only in 4th and 5th grade during this time -and was only aware of the music. Jackson has opened up my eyes to see how often the Beatles, Stones, Byrds, and Dylan borrowed from each other, and others. For example: "Satisfaction" is just a remake of "Dancing in the Streets." Full of quotes and insights and terms (like "the jangle") that were new to me, I found this turning poi In this book, Jackson connects various musical entities with social movements and makes many unexpected connections. I was only in 4th and 5th grade during this time -and was only aware of the music. Jackson has opened up my eyes to see how often the Beatles, Stones, Byrds, and Dylan borrowed from each other, and others. For example: "Satisfaction" is just a remake of "Dancing in the Streets." Full of quotes and insights and terms (like "the jangle") that were new to me, I found this turning point in our culture to be a truly remarkable one. Before this I would have said it was 67 or 68 that the changes happened: yet The roots of it all were happenings strongly in 65. Recommended reading for music lovers.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob Roy

    The author's premise is that 1965 marked revoutionary changes in music. He makes a good case in this belief. He follows multiple musicians and groups throughout the year establishing their molding and adapting to musical change. For those interested in the late 1960s, this is a must-read. The 1960s were musically driven, far more than drugs and protest. The book also does an excellent job of highlighting historical events of that year that affected music, and more importantly, how. 1965 for me wa The author's premise is that 1965 marked revoutionary changes in music. He makes a good case in this belief. He follows multiple musicians and groups throughout the year establishing their molding and adapting to musical change. For those interested in the late 1960s, this is a must-read. The 1960s were musically driven, far more than drugs and protest. The book also does an excellent job of highlighting historical events of that year that affected music, and more importantly, how. 1965 for me was the end of my junior and the beginning of my senior year in high school. I am quite familiar with the music, but not the history of its creation. This book well filled that gap.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Harron68

    A fine book for those who lived thru the era and for those who came along after. The rivalries and influences between bands and composers was really eye-opening. So much was going on in war, politics, civil rights too. That is highlighted as are music categories. Except for the (seemingly inevitable excesses of the celebs) the book reads fast and doesn't go too deeply into music composition theory. I rate it a 4 smileys!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    A worthwhile look back at an influential year, although I'm not convinced that it was the most revolutionary. (Personally, I lean more towards 1966-67). But this was a fun look back at a period I was part of. Most of the claims made here hold water, although there are a few too glib conclusions reached. A small selection of photos accompanies the text.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Solid overview of a seminal year in music and in general that for me was marred by a bizarre epilogue that seems to blame all of society’s current ills on what the author just finished telling us about.

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