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Those Who Speak

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In this canonical story from the lead writer of BioWare's Dragon Age games, reluctant monarch King Alistair travels to an empire of evil mages. Accompanied by the pirate captain Isabela and the underworld merchant Varric, Alistair will stop at nothing to uncover the fate of his lost father — even if it means battling an army of cultists singlehandedly! The fight turns even m In this canonical story from the lead writer of BioWare's Dragon Age games, reluctant monarch King Alistair travels to an empire of evil mages. Accompanied by the pirate captain Isabela and the underworld merchant Varric, Alistair will stop at nothing to uncover the fate of his lost father — even if it means battling an army of cultists singlehandedly! The fight turns even more personal as Alistair faces a former ally and Isabela must confront the tragedies of her past while imprisoned in the cultists' dungeon!


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In this canonical story from the lead writer of BioWare's Dragon Age games, reluctant monarch King Alistair travels to an empire of evil mages. Accompanied by the pirate captain Isabela and the underworld merchant Varric, Alistair will stop at nothing to uncover the fate of his lost father — even if it means battling an army of cultists singlehandedly! The fight turns even m In this canonical story from the lead writer of BioWare's Dragon Age games, reluctant monarch King Alistair travels to an empire of evil mages. Accompanied by the pirate captain Isabela and the underworld merchant Varric, Alistair will stop at nothing to uncover the fate of his lost father — even if it means battling an army of cultists singlehandedly! The fight turns even more personal as Alistair faces a former ally and Isabela must confront the tragedies of her past while imprisoned in the cultists' dungeon!

30 review for Those Who Speak

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    Isabella is one tough bitch. She comes across as cocky and almost careless, but it’s confidence born of skill. Her appearance is a weapon, one she uses to ensnare many men and even a few women. She gives her enemies a false sense of security; they think they have won her, though in reality she has manipulated them into letting their guard down. And that’s when she likes to strike. That’s when she kills. This is, of course, Alistair’s story, though the addition of Isabella’s point of view helped Isabella is one tough bitch. She comes across as cocky and almost careless, but it’s confidence born of skill. Her appearance is a weapon, one she uses to ensnare many men and even a few women. She gives her enemies a false sense of security; they think they have won her, though in reality she has manipulated them into letting their guard down. And that’s when she likes to strike. That’s when she kills. This is, of course, Alistair’s story, though the addition of Isabella’s point of view helped drive the story forward; it gave it an added edge. This wouldn’t have been half as good if Alistair narrated the events in this volume: it wouldn’t have worked. It would have lacked a certain degree of drama. By putting Isabella in the limelight, I got to see exactly how much her past has affected her. She rarely lets her true self show. Like I said, her appearance is deceptive. Under the bravado of sea captain and pirate queen is a woman who has made many, many, mistakes. And she knows this. I’d like to say that she learns from them, but in reality it doesn’t apply. She thrives on danger; she craves it. Her reckless personality deems that she is in countless situations of real danger, which meant that this was full of violent action. What’s also great about this is the inclusion of old characters from the very first dragon age game. We already have Alistair, and now we have the return of the mighty Sten. But, he’s been promoted. After the events in Kirkwall (Dragon Age 2) he is now the Arishok. He has a new place in the vastly complex Quanari culture. This means he is even more rigid and self-assured. I was surprised how he actually reacted to Alistair; it wasn’t out of character: it was just a little painful to watch. I suppose I just didn’t want to see the noble hearted fool that is the King of Ferelden treated so indignantly. Plot wise, this is very well written. We now have a clear idea who is behind the abduction of King Maric. Alistair now has a clear rival, and the story is drawing towards the climax of the final volume. I look forward to seeing it transpire, and admiring more of the artwork. The spell effects are very stylish. It’s time to finally get some closure on one of the biggest mysteries this excellent video game franchise posed. Dragon Age Graphic Novel Trilogy 1. The Silent Grove- A cool four stars 2. Those Who Speak- A solid four stars 3. Until We Sleep - A bloody four stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paige (Enchantology)

    Would it be rude to say that Isabela is sorta what Celaena Sardothien should have been? The two of them are very different, obviously, but I think the traits they share are shown better in Isabela than Celaena. *shrugggggg*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    I didn't realize this was Volume 2 of the series - that might explain why the characters felt a bit muddy and confused - you're supposed to know them already and understand the shorthand. Having finished the first Dragon Age game, I do know a couple of people who show up (King Alistair, and another friend from the first game), and I gather the rest are probably important to the second game. That being said, comics should be legible without all of the source material, and this doesn't quite get t I didn't realize this was Volume 2 of the series - that might explain why the characters felt a bit muddy and confused - you're supposed to know them already and understand the shorthand. Having finished the first Dragon Age game, I do know a couple of people who show up (King Alistair, and another friend from the first game), and I gather the rest are probably important to the second game. That being said, comics should be legible without all of the source material, and this doesn't quite get there. It has an interesting story, I assume setting up events of the second game as the major villain shows up for only a few moments before the story gets sidetracked with a Qunari plot. The art is overly flourished and saturated, with the lead, Isabela, straying near to cheesecake many times in the relatively short story. She has some strength and depth as a character, and the book does set up her story to make her intriguing, but it sometimes feel like it's in spite of itself instead of derived from itself. Overall it seems pretty forgettable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emelie

    Arc from NetGalley. Ah, the Dragon Age world. Fun to be visiting that again. It was an interesting read. Isabela joins up with Alistair to find out if his father is still alive, and alongside with Varric the two of them get into trouble. It was fun seeing new and old characters alike. It was interesting to get an fleshed-out Isabela. She felt more human, you get to understand her mentality better and some of her background. It made her more sympathetic. It was also interesting to learn some more Arc from NetGalley. Ah, the Dragon Age world. Fun to be visiting that again. It was an interesting read. Isabela joins up with Alistair to find out if his father is still alive, and alongside with Varric the two of them get into trouble. It was fun seeing new and old characters alike. It was interesting to get an fleshed-out Isabela. She felt more human, you get to understand her mentality better and some of her background. It made her more sympathetic. It was also interesting to learn some more about the Qunari. The art was was okay, but not extraordinary. They didn't translate the characters appearances from the game onto paper as how I would imagine. A quite fun, interesting short read for anyone that likes the Dragon Age world.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I never was a fan of Isabela, which makes me the minority here. I don't know... The story has gone along with my canon version of the video game, but I can see how it would really alienate people whose canon was completely opposite. You can actually have Alistair executed in the game, yet here he is as the King of Fereldan... It must be quite annoying for those people. I know not everyone can be pleased, but they've written content before that hasn't pointed towards any of the decisions made in I never was a fan of Isabela, which makes me the minority here. I don't know... The story has gone along with my canon version of the video game, but I can see how it would really alienate people whose canon was completely opposite. You can actually have Alistair executed in the game, yet here he is as the King of Fereldan... It must be quite annoying for those people. I know not everyone can be pleased, but they've written content before that hasn't pointed towards any of the decisions made in the game... Loved Sten being in it though! Well I guess he's Arishock now... Varric was right; Qunari names are just a confusion of grammar

  6. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    The story's okay, the artwork is good, but I can never quite accept the objectification of Isabela in a vast amount of drawings. There's a limit to how much t&a you can stand, and for me that limit is low. On the plus side, she's a cool character and it was good to get some of her background revealed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    5 stars This comics are fenomenal! i'm so kicking my head for only reading them now. The qunari, FRICKING STEN, the trio Isabela, Varric and Alistair make. I'm loving this. Can't wait for the next. Definitely recommend! :D

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (In Libris Veritas)

    Bioware certainly knows how to add depth to their worlds and they have a way of feeding you the information so that you’re always hungry for more, which is exactly what David Gaider does with Those Who Speak. Anyone familiar with the Dragon Age games immediately recognizes the names Alistair, Isabela and Varric; and though it does seem like a rather unlikely trio it works out perfectly. Alistair with his semi sarcastic/semi awkward humor, Isabela with both the street smarts and the fairly inappro Bioware certainly knows how to add depth to their worlds and they have a way of feeding you the information so that you’re always hungry for more, which is exactly what David Gaider does with Those Who Speak. Anyone familiar with the Dragon Age games immediately recognizes the names Alistair, Isabela and Varric; and though it does seem like a rather unlikely trio it works out perfectly. Alistair with his semi sarcastic/semi awkward humor, Isabela with both the street smarts and the fairly inappropriate quips, and Varris who is addicted to a good story and a good adventure. If you haven’t picked up The Silent Grove, I suggest you do so because Those Who Speak continues where that one left off. This book mainly focuses on Isabela and it even uncovers some of her past for us. Alistair is on a mission to find out why his father was killed and unfortunately this leads them through contested waters, where they run into the Qunari. If you’ve played DA 2 then you know Isabela has a bit of a history with the Qunari and it’s none too pleasant, so this unfortunate run in with brings forth some interesting truths about our scantly clad pirate queen; like her real name, why she took the Tome that started the Kirkwall incident, and events that truly haunt her. This alone makes reading this worthwhile because while we know some thing about Isabela she’s pretty tight lipped on any serious subject and will divert with a witty quip on her sex life. Alistair and Varric are not really in this one too much but the parts that they are also pretty great, and they have an encounter with a familiar face from DA 1. Anyone remember Sten? The original Qunari who was incredibly quiet and also quick to say something rather impersonal, he was my least favorite of the group but it’s great to see him again. He still looks the same which I’m kind of happy about since redoing his physical appearance would have brought down the initial shock factor of seeing him again. Also you get to see a female Qunari which is pretty awesome and she has some great scenes with Isabela. Overall this has some great background info and it’s really cool that they are really pulling the two games together more. It doesn’t really progress the storyline as far as Alistair goes but it sets it up so that you know the next release will give you that much needed information. This is definitely a must for anyone who really loves the Dragon Age games and characters. I received this from Dark Horse and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    The Silent Grove re-opened a few issues raised in Dragon Age: Origins and the prequel book, The Stolen Throne, and added a few new ingredients. I was worried that Those Who Speak would fail to deliver an appropriate conclusion to all of that in a mere three issues – and I was right. Fortunately, Those Who Speak is not a conclusion, but rather an interlude where King Alistair Theirren and his companions, the pirate queen, Isabela, and the dwarven businessman, Varric Tethras, gain a new old ally a The Silent Grove re-opened a few issues raised in Dragon Age: Origins and the prequel book, The Stolen Throne, and added a few new ingredients. I was worried that Those Who Speak would fail to deliver an appropriate conclusion to all of that in a mere three issues – and I was right. Fortunately, Those Who Speak is not a conclusion, but rather an interlude where King Alistair Theirren and his companions, the pirate queen, Isabela, and the dwarven businessman, Varric Tethras, gain a new old ally and, more importantly, we get a further peek inside Isabela. From book two onward, this is clearly Isabela’s story. Alistair’s hunt for his daddy and his dragon blood issues can wait. This is about the Pirate Queen that some players of Dragon Age II may have dismissed because of her penchant for sex, violence, sex, sex and abandonment. But in truth, despite being paid to accompany Alistair, she is fiercely loyal to those who earn her trust, even at cost to herself. Her devotion to her crew above all is admirable, as is her seemingly unbreakable spirit. As much as I like the visuals, I wish David Gaider had taken the time to make this another Dragon Age novel, instead of a series of comics. In his novels, he has more room to expand on these characters and is skilled enough in his descriptions of the places, actions and events that he could have brought far more to the story and characters than we see here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shiloh

    King Alistair has learned that his father, King Maric, might still be alive, and that a Tevinter mage is likely behind Maric's disappearance. Enlisting the help of pirate captain Isabela and Varric, he goes to Tevinter to find the mage in question. But they don't count on getting mixed up with the Qunanri, or meeting up with an old comrade of Alistair's. I very much enjoyed this story; it's nice to see tales of people we played with in the games but will likely not see again, except in passing, i King Alistair has learned that his father, King Maric, might still be alive, and that a Tevinter mage is likely behind Maric's disappearance. Enlisting the help of pirate captain Isabela and Varric, he goes to Tevinter to find the mage in question. But they don't count on getting mixed up with the Qunanri, or meeting up with an old comrade of Alistair's. I very much enjoyed this story; it's nice to see tales of people we played with in the games but will likely not see again, except in passing, in future games. The graphic novels also flesh out the characters; they're older, more mature, have more experience, and we're learning about backstory that never came up in the game, particularly Isabela's. Two things kept me from giving this 5 stars. First, the artwork, while really good, didn't always look as much like the original characters as I'd like. Alistair's jawline is different, for one thing, even underneath the new facial hair. (Also, what was up with Isabela's captain outfit?! How does that even stay up?!) Second, other than a few quips, the characters didn't have the same voice or tone as they did in the games, so I couldn't necessarily "hear" the characters saying these lines. I understand that Gaider wrote the game, as well, so I'm not saying he wrote it "wrong," just that he didn't write it quite as I'd expect.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erika Williams

    I actually read this one a while ago, yet somehow whenever it came time to do reviews, it kept slipping through the cracks. I love all things Dragon Age: I’ve read the books, I’ve played through both games multiple times (in the case of Origins, on multiple consoles) and I even own a shirt that suggests I enjoy feeding Alistair to the archdemon for breakfast. Isabella and Alistair are even two of my favorite characters, so Those Who Speak should be right up my alley, right next to this lovely ha I actually read this one a while ago, yet somehow whenever it came time to do reviews, it kept slipping through the cracks. I love all things Dragon Age: I’ve read the books, I’ve played through both games multiple times (in the case of Origins, on multiple consoles) and I even own a shirt that suggests I enjoy feeding Alistair to the archdemon for breakfast. Isabella and Alistair are even two of my favorite characters, so Those Who Speak should be right up my alley, right next to this lovely hatshop. Fair warning to those not in the know: Those Who Speak takes places after Dragon Age II and tosses player choices aside in favor of the plot they wanted to tell. I’ve found the best way to deal with this is to pretend Those Who Speak takes place in an alternate universe where the player character made some really terrible choices. That said, I can’t really comment much on the plot. You think the Fereldan nobility would have learned their lesson about allowing their monarch to go on adventures, unless things are really just that bad and they want Alistair dead. Since it is a comic, I feel obligated to briefly talk about the art. It’s beautiful, particularly Isabella’s costume design in the opening chapters. My biggest regret is that she never got to wear it in game.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Forgotten Realms Queen

    So this is going to be quick, simple and to the point. BioWare and Dragon Age creator David Gaider have been collaborating on a graphic novel series of the Dragon age game, taking place after the events of Dragon Age II. The first one, Silent Grove, sets Alistair on the path to finding his father’s killer, with hints that he might still be alive. Here, in the second installation Those Who Speak, the focus is taken off Alistair and placed squarely on the vivacious Rivian pirate queen Isabella. Isab So this is going to be quick, simple and to the point. BioWare and Dragon Age creator David Gaider have been collaborating on a graphic novel series of the Dragon age game, taking place after the events of Dragon Age II. The first one, Silent Grove, sets Alistair on the path to finding his father’s killer, with hints that he might still be alive. Here, in the second installation Those Who Speak, the focus is taken off Alistair and placed squarely on the vivacious Rivian pirate queen Isabella. Isabella, Alistair, and Varric travel to mage-ruled Tevinter attempting to tack and confront the one suspected of killing/kidnapping Alistair’s father Maric. They succeed, but the man escapes with the trio in hot pursuit. But not all goes as planned when their ship is attacked by Qunari and separated. Varric and Alistair are sequestered guests of an old friend who has become a new, powerful ally by the end of the book, and Isabella is subjected to an attempted conversion, and during her discussions with the priestess who is sent to convert her, we learn much about the pirate queen’s past, although not as much as we would like. A good addition to the collection of any Dragon Age fan like myself, and any fan of Isabella the pirate queen.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Godlewski

    Action packed follow up to the Silent Grove comic bundle by David Gaider. While the first one was narrated by Alistair as he tries to find his father, this one switches perspective to Isabella. The story continues with Alistair, Varric, and Isabella catching up with the mage who was pointed out in the Silent Grove bundle as King Maric's abductor in Tevinter. From there, it's a dangerous trip into Qunari waters trying to track him down after he escapes a confrontation with the heroes. The group i Action packed follow up to the Silent Grove comic bundle by David Gaider. While the first one was narrated by Alistair as he tries to find his father, this one switches perspective to Isabella. The story continues with Alistair, Varric, and Isabella catching up with the mage who was pointed out in the Silent Grove bundle as King Maric's abductor in Tevinter. From there, it's a dangerous trip into Qunari waters trying to track him down after he escapes a confrontation with the heroes. The group is captured, and it is here we learn key information about Isabella's past that was not bought up in the games. Overall I'd give this a 3.5 as the action is great, but outside of Isabella's revelations about her past, not much in character building or plot. Art is really good and vibrant, which is a bit of a departure from the dark, heavy tones of the game.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    Quick storyline with two of my favorite characters from Dragon Age. I'm a little disappointed Varric didn't talk about his books and getting himself into mischief. The book was a little too short but it is so close to the game that all is forgiven. I actually was falling asleep when I was writing this so I didn't finish my little review of the book. The issue I had with this story was the lack of any real villains, the second game also struggled in this department. I enjoy the universe and the cr Quick storyline with two of my favorite characters from Dragon Age. I'm a little disappointed Varric didn't talk about his books and getting himself into mischief. The book was a little too short but it is so close to the game that all is forgiven. I actually was falling asleep when I was writing this so I didn't finish my little review of the book. The issue I had with this story was the lack of any real villains, the second game also struggled in this department. I enjoy the universe and the creativity around it, so I'm not saying it's a series issue. The second game just wasn't the ground breaking storyline that Origins or the latest game was, the newest game was really epic in its scope. If you're like me you will find that you'll enjoy the story but won't find depth or hidden eggs in the artwork.

  15. 4 out of 5

    TheTick

    Reviewing at my site also. Following Dragon Age: The Silent Grove, Dragon Age: Those Who Speak takes Alistair, Varric and Isabela to the Tevinter Imperium, giving us a taste of that foul place, continuing Alistair's quest to find out what happened to King Maric. This book seemed to move along a bit better, and gives you some insight into our favorite pirate lass. There's one more 'friendly' face that appears but I won't spoil it. Definitely worth picking up if you're itching for something to hold Reviewing at my site also. Following Dragon Age: The Silent Grove, Dragon Age: Those Who Speak takes Alistair, Varric and Isabela to the Tevinter Imperium, giving us a taste of that foul place, continuing Alistair's quest to find out what happened to King Maric. This book seemed to move along a bit better, and gives you some insight into our favorite pirate lass. There's one more 'friendly' face that appears but I won't spoil it. Definitely worth picking up if you're itching for something to hold you over until Dragon Age III: Inquisition comes out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    The Sapphic Nerd

    Whereas "The Silent Grove" focused on the story behind Alistair's bloodline, "Those Who Speak" focuses on Isabela's story. "Those Who Speak" continues "The Silent Grove", bringing Isabela, Varric, and Alistair to Tevinter where we are introduced to Maevaris Tilani, a relative of Varric's, encounter a former companion, meet a (to me at least) very interesting potential qunari antagonist, and learn about Isabela's past and character. It leaves you eager to find out what position Isabela will be in Whereas "The Silent Grove" focused on the story behind Alistair's bloodline, "Those Who Speak" focuses on Isabela's story. "Those Who Speak" continues "The Silent Grove", bringing Isabela, Varric, and Alistair to Tevinter where we are introduced to Maevaris Tilani, a relative of Varric's, encounter a former companion, meet a (to me at least) very interesting potential qunari antagonist, and learn about Isabela's past and character. It leaves you eager to find out what position Isabela will be in come Dragon Age Inquisition.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Gouin

    This second volume is through the voice of Isabela the Pirate Queen. And she's awesome. I loved her backstory, very engaging. There was a lot more sword battles in this one, true to Dragon Age fashion. However, the issue I'm having is we got so little plot progression. Right now the series is in three parts with this being part 2...and we only get one nugget of information. There is just so much set up...where is it going to end? Instead of publishing 3 short adventures one large one would have This second volume is through the voice of Isabela the Pirate Queen. And she's awesome. I loved her backstory, very engaging. There was a lot more sword battles in this one, true to Dragon Age fashion. However, the issue I'm having is we got so little plot progression. Right now the series is in three parts with this being part 2...and we only get one nugget of information. There is just so much set up...where is it going to end? Instead of publishing 3 short adventures one large one would have been more effective. Otherwise, a great story. :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    When I first saw Isabela's Dragon Age II incarnation I paused and couldn't help but roll my eyes. Thinking she was purely some sex doll thrown into the plot for the benefit of younger male gamers. But as I got to know her, I found I really enjoyed the character as she often made me laugh. In the end Isabela turned out to be a well rounded character, one I could empathise with, so I found the back story (of sorts) contained in this volume especially interesting. The overall bridging story fell a When I first saw Isabela's Dragon Age II incarnation I paused and couldn't help but roll my eyes. Thinking she was purely some sex doll thrown into the plot for the benefit of younger male gamers. But as I got to know her, I found I really enjoyed the character as she often made me laugh. In the end Isabela turned out to be a well rounded character, one I could empathise with, so I found the back story (of sorts) contained in this volume especially interesting. The overall bridging story fell a little flat, but ultimately I enjoyed it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Passey Mason

    IMO these three graphic novels by David Gaider are mandatory reading for all Dragon Age fans. Not only do we get new adventures with three of our favorite characters (Alistair, Isabela, Varric) but Gaider also reveals information with significant implications for the future of Thedas. He's obviously building up to something big regarding the role of dragons in the world and I suspect that these graphic novels contain hints about the major plotline for a future game.

  20. 4 out of 5

    L.M

    So this is my favorite issue because if narrates from Isabela's POV. I think the author does a great job with keeping the characters in, well, character. The story continues where The Silent Grove left off and we stumble into the arms of Isabela's favourite race of Thedas. Two, you guessed it, the qunari...and all hell kind of breaks loose. Good fun adventure and we get to know more about Isabela's past.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashly Steele

    Meh. I do not like the characterization of Alistair and Isabella. At all. But, because I can't stay away from anything Dragon Age-related, I will probably read the third volume and return to complain about that one too. If only the comics' canon was not so distant from my own! My Grey Warden cries at the state of events and being so wrongfully separated from her one and only beau...:(

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Isabela's perspective! It's so interesting. Isabela is Isablea. It's hard to expain. What a great character, and learning more about her back story was so interesting. I loved the artwork done for teen-Isabela.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krissy

    Isabela is best.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bmeyer

    Probably my favorite of the Dragon Age comics. It's hard to say no to all my favorite characters in one spot.

  25. 4 out of 5

    lois

    ISABELLA MY DAUGHTER

  26. 4 out of 5

    Monika

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Let me spare you some time, as reading this is not worth it: Sten is Arishok, Isabela's mother is the follower of the Qun, and Isabela's not her name at all. That's about everything worth noting about this piece of garbage.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I liked learning more and more about Isabela and her history! She’s one of my favorite Dragon Age characters, and it was very nice to learn so much more about her and why she is the way she is.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Darío

    Isabela destroy me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    If you have played Dragon Age 2, then this series of graphic novels tells a nice story, looks great and feels like a part of the universe.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nim

    I really disliked this volume. Which is sad, because story-wise I was more interested in it than the previous. Things weren't a vague mess like in The Silent Grove. There was actually action and excitement that you were invested in. So, what is my issue then? All my favorite things about Bioware and the Dragon Age games are not only *not* present, but the opposite prevails in this comic series. The only women present (Isabela, the witch, the Qunari priestess, and an unnamed elven slave woman) ar I really disliked this volume. Which is sad, because story-wise I was more interested in it than the previous. Things weren't a vague mess like in The Silent Grove. There was actually action and excitement that you were invested in. So, what is my issue then? All my favorite things about Bioware and the Dragon Age games are not only *not* present, but the opposite prevails in this comic series. The only women present (Isabela, the witch, the Qunari priestess, and an unnamed elven slave woman) are all extremely sexualized. To the point where it takes you out of the story. It is particularly disturbing in the case of the elven slave, who in the sole scene where she is present, a scene that is supposed to be emotionally dramatic, needs to have her already threadbare garment lifted up leaving her almost entirely exposed... as she plummets to her death. Really? Even in her last moments a female character needs to look appealing to the assumed straight male audience? It took me out of the moment and ruined a poignant scene. I continued reading only out of a sense of obligation after having fallen in love with the Dragon Age world. But this makes very clear to me the fact that these comics weren't written for me, and perhaps the problem isn't that I just 'don't like comics' but that they are excluding a sizable potential audience by objectifying them instead.

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